IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fau/aucocz/au2012_225.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Who Cares about Inflation? Empirical Evidence from the Czech Republic

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Berlemann

    (Helmut-Schmidt-University Hamburg, Faculty of Economics & Social Sciences, Hamburg, Germany)

Abstract

Most central banks around the globe have the primary task to fight inflation. In the light of the fact that at least moderate inflation turns out to have little effect on the economy this is somewhat surprising. In order to understand why many countries have installed central banks which (almost exclusively) focus on fighting inflation it is necessary to understand why people care about inflation. However, comparatively little knowledge is yet available on the individual determinants of inflation aversion. Up to now, empirical (and quite inconclusive) evidence is available for a number of large Western democracies. Moreover, the evidence is mostly drawn from pure cross section data. Thus, it is yet unclear in how far the results depend on the prevailing macroeconomic situation and can be generalized. In this paper we study the individual determinants of inflation aversion in the Czech Republic. Using data from 11 waves of the Eurobarometer survey we find age, political orientation, education and the macroeconomic situation to have significant effects on the revealed preferences towards fighting inflation while income seems not to play a significant role.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Berlemann, 2012. "Who Cares about Inflation? Empirical Evidence from the Czech Republic," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 6(3), pages 225-243, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:aucocz:au2012_225
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://auco.cuni.cz/mag/article/download/id/134/type/attachment
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barro, Robert J. & Gordon, David B., 1983. "Rules, discretion and reputation in a model of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 101-121.
    2. Hibbs, Douglas A., 1977. "Political Parties and Macroeconomic Policy," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(4), pages 1467-1487, December.
    3. Robert J. MacCulloch & Rafael Di Tella & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Preferences over Inflation and Unemployment: Evidence from Surveys of Happiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 335-341, March.
    4. Dyba, Karel & Svejnar, Jan, 1991. "Czechoslovakia: Recent Economic Developments and Prospects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 185-190, May.
    5. Elissa Braunstein & James Heintz, 2008. "Gender bias and central bank policy: employment and inflation reduction," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 173-186.
    6. Jayadev, Arjun, 2006. "Differing preferences between anti-inflation and anti-unemployment policy among the rich and the poor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 67-71, April.
    7. Gary Chamberlain, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 225-238.
    8. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2004. "How Important is Methodology for the estimates of the determinants of Happiness?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(497), pages 641-659, July.
    9. Kormendi, Roger C. & Meguire, Philip G., 1985. "Macroeconomic determinants of growth: Cross-country evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 141-163, September.
    10. Michael Berlemann, 2011. "ECB Presidency and Inflation Aversion among the Citizens of European Countries: An Empirical Assessment," CESifo Forum, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(02), pages 88-92, July.
    11. Jonung, Lars, 1981. "Perceived and Expected Rates of Inflation in Sweden," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 961-968, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Berlemann, Michael, 2014. "Inflation aversion in transition countries: Empirical evidence from the Baltic States," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 415-432.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Berlemann, Michael, 2014. "Inflation aversion in transition countries: Empirical evidence from the Baltic States," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 415-432.
    2. Maximilian Riedl & Ingo Geishecker, 2014. "Keep it simple: estimation strategies for ordered response models with fixed effects," Journal of Applied Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(11), pages 2358-2374, November.
    3. Heinz Welsch & Jan Kühling, 2011. "Anti-Inflation Policy Benefits the Poor: Evidence from Subjective Well-Being Data," Working Papers V-343-11, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2011.
    4. Heinz Welsch & Jan K¨¹hling, 2015. "Macroeconomic Preferences by Income and Education Level: Evidence from Subjective Well-Being Data," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 5, pages 15-32, August.
    5. Robert Rudolf, 2014. "Work Shorter, Be Happier? Longitudinal Evidence from the Korean Five-Day Working Policy," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(5), pages 1139-1163, October.
    6. Becchetti, Leonardo & Castriota, Stefano & Giuntella, Giovanni Osea, 2010. "The effects of age and job protection on the welfare costs of inflation and unemployment," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 137-146, March.
    7. Schmitt, Maike, 2013. "Subjective Well-Being and Air Quality in Germany," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 133(2), pages 275-286.
    8. Matteo Migheli, 2016. "Behind the Wall: What Remains of the “Communist Legacy” in Contemporary Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 671-690, June.
    9. Mathias Sinning & Shane Worner, 2010. "Inter-ethnic Marriage and Partner Satisfaction," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2010-533, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    10. repec:got:cegedp:116 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Leonardo Becchetti & Alessandra Pelloni, 2013. "What are we learning from the life satisfaction literature?," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 60(2), pages 113-155, June.
    12. Andrew M. Jones & Stefanie Schurer, 2011. "How does heterogeneity shape the socioeconomic gradient in health satisfaction?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 549-579, June.
    13. Barbara Dluhosch & Daniel Horgos, 2013. "Trading Up the Happiness Ladder," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(3), pages 973-990, September.
    14. Michael Berlemann, 2005. "Time inconsistency of monetary policy: Empirical evidence from polls," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 1-15, July.
    15. repec:zbw:hohpro:343 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Gartner, Manfred, 2000. "Political Macroeconomics: A Survey of Recent Developments," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(5), pages 527-561, December.
    17. Geishecker, Ingo & Riedl, Maximilian, 2012. "Ordered response models and non-random personality traits: Monte Carlo simulations and a practical guide," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 116, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    18. Barbara Dluhosch & Daniel Horgos & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "Social Choice and Social Unemployment-Income Cleavages: New Insights from Happiness Research," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(6), pages 1513-1537, December.
    19. repec:old:wpaper:343 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Elissa Braunstein, 2013. "Central bank policy and gender," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 21, pages 345-358, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    21. van den Berg, Bernard & Fiebig, Denzil G. & Hall, Jane, 2014. "Well-being losses due to care-giving," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 123-131.
    22. Lohmann, Susanne, 1997. "Partisan control of the money supply and decentralized appointment powers," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 225-246, May.
    23. Andrew E. Clark, 2015. "SWB as a Measure of Individual Well-Being," Working Papers halshs-01134483, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation; inflation aversion; preferences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fau:aucocz:au2012_225. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/icunicz.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Lenka Stastna (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/icunicz.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.