IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

A theory of linkage between monetary policy and banking failure in developing countries


  • Raulin L. Cadet


Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present a model that studies the impact of a tightening monetary policy on banking failure in a developing country. Design/methodology/approach - The interest rate on treasury bills is included in the model to measure monetary policy. Since the model considers developing countries with low-income level, the paper assumes that a secondary market does not exist. Findings - The model shows that, despite treasury bills constituting an alternative source of profit for banks in developing countries, a tightening monetary policy increases the probability of banking failure. In addition, the model shows that efficiency level explains the asymmetric effect of monetary policy on the profit of the banks. Practical implications - The policy implication of the results of the paper is that the central bank should take into account the adverse effect of a tightening monetary policy on banking failure, when planning policy decisions. Originality/value - The paper offers insights into the linkage between monetary policy and banking failure in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Raulin L. Cadet, 2009. "A theory of linkage between monetary policy and banking failure in developing countries," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(2), pages 143-154, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:jfeppp:v:1:y:2009:i:2:p:143-154

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Patrick Bolton & Xavier Freixas, 2006. "Corporate Finance and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 19(3), pages 829-870.
    2. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 1990. "New Evidence on the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 21(1), pages 149-214.
    3. Zarruk, Emilio R. & Madura, Jeff, 1992. "Optimal Bank Interest Margin under Capital Regulation and Deposit Insurance," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 27(01), pages 143-149, March.
    4. David C. Wheelock & Paul W. Wilson, 2000. "Why do Banks Disappear? The Determinants of U.S. Bank Failures and Acquisitions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(1), pages 127-138, February.
    5. Arena, Marco, 2008. "Bank failures and bank fundamentals: A comparative analysis of Latin America and East Asia during the nineties using bank-level data," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 299-310, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Banking; Business failures; Monetary policy; Interest rates; Developing countries;

    JEL classification:

    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eme:jfeppp:v:1:y:2009:i:2:p:143-154. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Virginia Chapman). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.