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Youth Smoking Uptake Progress: Price and Public Policy Effects

Author

Listed:
  • Hana Ross

    () (American Cancer Society)

  • Frank J. Chaloupka

    (University of Illinois at Chicago
    National Bureau of Economic Research)

  • Melanie Wakefield

    (Center for Behavioral Research in Cancer, Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria)

Abstract

The differential effects of cigarette prices, smoking restrictions, and youth access laws on five stages of smoking uptake among U.S. high school students is examined. The results of the generalized ordered logit indicate that higher cigarette prices are negatively related to being further on the smoking uptake continuum and that their impact is increasing with the probability of becoming an established smoker increases. Compliance with youth access laws may slow the uptake process. This effect is strongest for students at the last stages of smoking uptake. Higher cigarette prices and policies reducing youth access to cigarettes can interrupt adolescents' progress toward becoming daily, addicted smokers.

Suggested Citation

  • Hana Ross & Frank J. Chaloupka & Melanie Wakefield, 2006. "Youth Smoking Uptake Progress: Price and Public Policy Effects," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 355-367, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:32:y:2006:i:2:p:355-367
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    File URL: http://web.holycross.edu/RePEc/eej/Archive/Volume32/V32N2P355_367.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Emery, Sherry & White, Martha M. & Pierce, John P., 2001. "Does cigarette price influence adolescent experimentation?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 261-270, March.
    2. Hana Ross & Frank J. Chaloupka, 2003. "The effect of cigarette prices on youth smoking," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 217-230.
    3. Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Youth Smoking in the U.S.: Prices and Policies," NBER Working Papers 7506, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Frank J. Chaloupka & Michael Grossman, 1996. "Price, Tobacco Control Policies and Youth Smoking," NBER Working Papers 5740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. DeCicca, Philip & Kenkel, Donald & Mathios, Alan, 2000. "Putting Out The Fires: Will Higher Taxes Reduce Youth Smoking?," Working Papers 00-3, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    6. Douglas, Stratford & Hariharan, Govind, 1994. "The hazard of starting smoking: Estimates from a split population duration model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 213-230, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Laura Blow & Andrew Leicester & Frank Windmeijer, 2005. "Parental income and children's smoking behaviour: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," IFS Working Papers W05/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    2. Sen Anindya & Ariizumi Hideki & Driambe Daciana, 2010. "Do Changes In Cigarette Taxes Impact Youth Smoking? Evidence from Canadian Provinces," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 1-25, August.
    3. Leah K. Lakdawala & David Simon, 2016. "The Intergenerational Consequences of Tobacco Policy," Working papers 2016-27, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    4. Fang, Hai & Ali, Mir M. & Rizzo, John A., 2009. "Does smoking affect body weight and obesity in China?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 334-350, December.

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