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The significance of transport mobility in predicting well-being

Listed author(s):
  • Vella-Brodrick, Dianne A.
  • Stanley, Janet
Registered author(s):

    Transport mobility provides increased opportunities for individuals to undertake fundamental tasks beyond the home environment, such as going to work and purchasing essential goods. Moreover, transport mobility may also play an important role in helping to satisfy inherent psychosocial needs which are deemed necessary for well-being, such as relating well with others, feelings of competence and mastery, and heightened autonomy. Exploring these relationships more fully is the focus of the current study. Based on responses from 435 participants from Melbourne, Australia, hierarchical regression analyses were undertaken to test whether transport mobility predicts subjective well-being as mediated by psychological well-being (N=435). Support was found for a full mediation model, whereby transport mobility predicted subjective well-being through the mediating variables of environmental mastery, positive relations with others and self acceptance. Thus, the impact and benefits of transport mobility extend to psychosocial factors related to well-being. Although additional work is needed to confirm these findings using varied samples and measurement approaches, this is a valuable outcome which provides some justification for developing policy and investing resources into improving transport mobility to promote highly desirable outcomes related to well-being.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967070X13000929
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transport Policy.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 236-242

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:29:y:2013:i:c:p:236-242
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2013.06.005
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    1. Cecilia Bergstad & Amelie Gamble & Tommy Gärling & Olle Hagman & Merritt Polk & Dick Ettema & Margareta Friman & Lars Olsson, 2011. "Subjective well-being related to satisfaction with daily travel," Transportation, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 1-15, January.
    2. Dianne Vella-Brodrick & Nansook Park & Christopher Peterson, 2009. "Three Ways to Be Happy: Pleasure, Engagement, and Meaning—Findings from Australian and US Samples," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 90(2), pages 165-179, January.
    3. David Metz, 2003. "Transport policy for an ageing population," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 375-386, July.
    4. Stanley, John K. & Hensher, David A. & Stanley, Janet R. & Vella-Brodrick, Dianne, 2011. "Mobility, social exclusion and well-being: Exploring the links," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 789-801, October.
    5. Graham Currie & Alexa Delbosc, 2010. "Modelling the social and psychological impacts of transport disadvantage," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(6), pages 953-966, November.
    6. Stanley, Janet & Vella-Brodrick, Dianne, 2009. "The usefulness of social exclusion to inform social policy in transport," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 90-96, July.
    7. Spinney, Jamie E.L. & Scott, Darren M. & Newbold, K. Bruce, 2009. "Transport mobility benefits and quality of life: A time-use perspective of elderly Canadians," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 1-11, January.
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