IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v83y2016icp14-29.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Multimodal travel groups and attitudes: A latent class cluster analysis of Dutch travelers

Author

Listed:
  • Molin, Eric
  • Mokhtarian, Patricia
  • Kroesen, Maarten

Abstract

For developing sustainable travel policies, it may be helpful to identify multimodal travelers, that is, travelers who make use of more than one mode of transport within a given period of time. Of special interest is identifying car drivers who also use public transport and/or bicycle, as this group is more likely to respond to policies that stimulate the use of those modes. It is suggested in the literature that this group may have less biased perceptions and different attitudes towards those modes. This supposition is examined in this paper by conducting a latent class cluster analysis, which identifies (multi)modal travel groups based on the self-reported frequency of mode use. Simultaneously, a membership function is estimated to predict the probability of belonging to each of the five identified (multi)modal travel groups, as a function of attitudinal variables in addition to structural variables. The results indicate that the (near) solo car drivers indeed have more negative attitudes towards public transport and bicycle, while frequent car drivers who also use public transport have less negative public transport attitudes. Although the results suggest that in four of the five identified travel groups, attitudes are congruent with travel mode use, this is not the case for the group who uses public transport most often. This group has relatively favorable car attitudes, and given that many young, low-income travelers belong to this group, it may be expected that at least part of this group will start using car more often once they can afford it. Based on the results, challenges for sustainable policies are formulated for each of the identified (multi)modal travel groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Molin, Eric & Mokhtarian, Patricia & Kroesen, Maarten, 2016. "Multimodal travel groups and attitudes: A latent class cluster analysis of Dutch travelers," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 14-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:83:y:2016:i:c:p:14-29
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2015.11.001
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965856415002591
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kitamura, Ryuichi & Yamamoto, Toshiyuki & Susilo, Yusak O. & Axhausen, Kay W., 2006. "How routine is a routine? An analysis of the day-to-day variability in prism vertex location," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 259-279, March.
    2. Kathleen Deutsch & Konstadinos Goulias, 2013. "Decision makers and socializers, social networks and the role of individuals as participants," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 755-771, July.
    3. Goulias, Konstadinos G. & Henson, Kriste M., 2006. "On Altruists and Egoists in Activity Participation and Travel: Who are they and do they live together?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt0p36z3r0, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Heinen, Eva & Chatterjee, Kiron, 2015. "The same mode again? An exploration of mode choice variability in Great Britain using the National Travel Survey," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 266-282.
    5. Marco Diana & Patricia Mokhtarian, 2009. "Grouping travelers on the basis of their different car and transit levels of use," Transportation, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 455-467, July.
    6. Vij, Akshay, 2013. "Incorporating the Influence of Latent Modal Preferences in Travel Demand Models," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7nq9p0cv, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Ralph Buehler & Andrea Hamre, 2015. "The multimodal majority? Driving, walking, cycling, and public transportation use among American adults," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(6), pages 1081-1101, November.
    8. Robert Schlich & Kay Axhausen, 2003. "Habitual travel behaviour: Evidence from a six-week travel diary," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 13-36, February.
    9. Vij, Akshay, 2013. "Incorporating the Influence of Latent Modal Preferences in Travel Demand Models," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7ng2z24q, University of California Transportation Center.
    10. Jarad Beckman & Konstadinos Goulias, 2008. "Immigration, residential location, car ownership, and commuting behavior: a multivariate latent class analysis from California," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(5), pages 655-671, August.
    11. Lavery, T.A. & Páez, A. & Kanaroglou, P.S., 2013. "Driving out of choices: An investigation of transport modality in a university sample," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 37-46.
    12. Van Exel, N.J.A. & Rietveld, P., 2009. "Could you also have made this trip by another mode? An investigation of perceived travel possibilities of car and train travellers on the main travel corridors to the city of Amsterdam, The Netherland," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 374-385, May.
    13. Konstadinos Goulias & Kriste Henson, 2006. "On altruists and egoists in activity participation and travel: who are they and do they live together?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 33(5), pages 447-462, September.
    14. Kroesen, Maarten, 2014. "Modeling the behavioral determinants of travel behavior: An application of latent transition analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 56-67.
    15. Vij, Akshay & Carrel, André & Walker, Joan L., 2013. "Incorporating the influence of latent modal preferences on travel mode choice behavior," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 164-178.
    16. Anable, Jillian, 2005. "'Complacent Car Addicts' or 'Aspiring Environmentalists'? Identifying travel behaviour segments using attitude theory," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 65-78, January.
    17. Banister, David, 2008. "The sustainable mobility paradigm," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 73-80, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:transa:v:107:y:2018:i:c:p:140-151 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:transa:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:221-237 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:kap:transp:v:45:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11116-016-9751-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mao, Zidan & Ettema, Dick & Dijst, Martin, 2016. "Commuting trip satisfaction in Beijing: Exploring the influence of multimodal behavior and modal flexibility," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 592-603.
    5. Scheiner, Joachim & Chatterjee, Kiron & Heinen, Eva, 2016. "Key events and multimodality: A life course approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 148-165.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:83:y:2016:i:c:p:14-29. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.