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Household travel surveys: Where are we going?

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  • Stopher, Peter R.
  • Greaves, Stephen P.

Abstract

In this paper, we commence by reviewing the recent history of household travel surveys. We note some of the problems that contemporary surveys are encountering throughout the world. We also review the data demands of current and emerging travel demand models, concluding that there are many new demands being placed on data, both in terms of the extent of the data required and the accuracy and completeness of the data. Noting that the standard method for conducting most household travel surveys is, and has been for some years, a diary, we briefly explore the evolution of the diary survey from the late 1970s to the present. In the next section of the paper, we explore a number of facets of potential future data collection. We include in this the use of GPS devices to measure travel, the potential of panel designs and some of the alternatives within panel designs, the development of continuous household travel surveys, especially in Australia, and the emerging capabilities in data fusion. Using some of these emerging methods for data collection and data simulation, we then propose a new paradigm for data collection that places the emphasis on a paid, national panel that is designed as a rotating, split panel, with the cross-sectional component conducted as a continuing survey. The basis of the panel data collection is proposed as GPS with demographic data, and the continuing national sample would also use GPS at its core. The potential to add in such specialised surveys as stated choice and process surveys is also noted as an advantage of the panel approach. We also explore briefly the notion that a special access panel or panels could be included as part of the design.

Suggested Citation

  • Stopher, Peter R. & Greaves, Stephen P., 2007. "Household travel surveys: Where are we going?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(5), pages 367-381, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:41:y:2007:i:5:p:367-381
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cook, Jonathan A. & Sanchirico, James N. & Salon, Deborah & Williams, Jeffrey, 2015. "Empirical distributions of vehicle use and fuel efficiency across space: Implications of asymmetry for measuring policy incidence," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 187-199.
    2. Jan U. Becker & Sönke Albers, 2016. "The limits of analyzing service quality data in public transport," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(5), pages 823-842, September.
    3. S. Veenstra & T. Thomas & S. Tutert, 2010. "Trip distribution for limited destinations: a case study for grocery shopping trips in the Netherlands," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 663-676, July.
    4. Firnkorn, Jörg, 2012. "Triangulation of two methods measuring the impacts of a free-floating carsharing system in Germany," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1654-1672.
    5. Chen, Cynthia & Gong, Hongmian & Lawson, Catherine & Bialostozky, Evan, 2010. "Evaluating the feasibility of a passive travel survey collection in a complex urban environment: Lessons learned from the New York City case study," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 830-840, December.
    6. Ivana Semanjski & Rik Bellens & Sidharta Gautama & Frank Witlox, 2016. "Integrating Big Data into a Sustainable Mobility Policy 2.0 Planning Support System," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-19, November.
    7. Jariyasunant, Jerald & Carrel, Andre & Ekambaram, Venkatesan & Gaker, DJ & Kote, Thejovardhana & Sengupta, Raja & Walker, Joan L., 2011. "The Quantified Traveler: Using personal travel data to promote sustainable transport behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt678537sx, University of California Transportation Center.
    8. Danalet, Antonin & Tinguely, Loïc & Lapparent, Matthieu de & Bierlaire, Michel, 2016. "Location choice with longitudinal WiFi data," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 1-17.
    9. Miaoyi Li & Lei Dong & Zhenjiang Shen & Wei Lang & Xinyue Ye, 2017. "Examining the Interaction of Taxi and Subway Ridership for Sustainable Urbanization," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-12, February.
    10. Patrick Bonnel & Etienne Hombourger & Ana-Maria Olteanu-Raimond & Zbigniew Smoreda, 2015. "Passive Mobile Phone Dataset to Construct Origin-destination Matrix: Potentials and Limitations," Post-Print halshs-01664219, HAL.
    11. repec:kap:transp:v:45:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11116-016-9726-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Michael Adjemian & Jeffrey Williams, 2009. "Using census aggregates to proxy for household characteristics: an application to vehicle ownership," Transportation, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 223-241, March.
    13. De Gennaro, Michele & Paffumi, Elena & Scholz, Harald & Martini, Giorgio, 2014. "GIS-driven analysis of e-mobility in urban areas: An evaluation of the impact on the electric energy grid," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 94-116.
    14. Jariyasunant, Jerald & Carrel, Andre & Ekambaram, Venkatesan & Gaker, DJ & Kote, Thejovardhana & Sengupta, Raja & Walker, Joan L., 2011. "The Quantified Traveler: Using personal travel data to promote sustainable transport behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9jg0p1rj, University of California Transportation Center.
    15. Habib, Khandker M. Nurul & Swait, Joffre & Salem, Sarah, 2014. "Using repeated cross-sectional travel surveys to enhance forecasting robustness: Accounting for changing mode preferences," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 110-126.
    16. Winters, Meghan & Voss, Christine & Ashe, Maureen C. & Gutteridge, Kaitlyn & McKay, Heather & Sims-Gould, Joanie, 2015. "Where do they go and how do they get there? Older adults' travel behaviour in a highly walkable environment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 304-312.
    17. Anne Aguiléra & Jean Grébert, 2014. "Passenger transport mode share in cities: exploration of actual and future trends with a worldwide survey," International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 14(3/4), pages 203-216.

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