IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v34y2000i5p321-338.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Travel reduction strategies: intentions and outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Marshall, Stephen
  • Banister, David

Abstract

Continuing growth in travel has led to concerns about the environment and sustainability, and hence the need to attempt to reduce travel, particularly by car. This paper considers the types of travel reduction strategy available, in terms of the implicit mechanisms of switching or substitution by which travel would be modified or reduced, and evaluates their potential impacts by means of four case studies in European cities. It is found that the various travel reduction strategies have had qualified success. The strategies to some extent achieve reduction in car travel, mainly through switching to other modes, although also through reduced travel distance. However, the scale of the reduction is relatively small and may be offset by new traffic generation. In addition, in some cases the objectives of the measures, although potentially having a travel reduction contribution, are not always aimed directly at travel reduction as such, and therefore may not be able to deliver the intended travel reduction. The paper concludes that the way forward would appear to lie in setting clear policy objectives and in assembling travel reduction measures into strategy packages, ensuring that when combined the measures are complementary towards the policy objectives of travel reduction.

Suggested Citation

  • Marshall, Stephen & Banister, David, 2000. "Travel reduction strategies: intentions and outcomes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 321-338, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:34:y:2000:i:5:p:321-338
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965-8564(99)00034-8
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tal, Gil & Cohen-Blankshtain, Galit, 2011. "Understanding the role of the forecast-maker in overestimation forecasts of policy impacts: The case of Travel Demand Management policies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(5), pages 389-400, June.
    2. Zhang, Dapeng & Magalhães, David José Ahouagi Vaz & Wang, Xiaokun (Cara), 2014. "Prioritizing bicycle paths in Belo Horizonte City, Brazil: Analysis based on user preferences and willingness considering individual heterogeneity," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 268-278.
    3. Thomas Vanoutrive & Ann Verhetsel, 2013. "Classifying transport studies using three dimensions of society: market structure, sustainability and decision making," Chapters,in: Smart Transport Networks, chapter 1, pages 1-8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Marco Percoco, 2010. "Urban Transport Policies And The Environment: Evidence From Italy," Articles, International Journal of Transport Economics, vol. 37(2).
    5. Song, Yena & Preston, John & Ogilvie, David, 2017. "New walking and cycling infrastructure and modal shift in the UK: A quasi-experimental panel study," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 320-333.
    6. Aguiléra, Anne & Wenglenski, Sandrine & Proulhac, Laurent, 2009. "Employment suburbanisation, reverse commuting and travel behaviour by residents of the central city in the Paris metropolitan area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 685-691, August.
    7. O'Fallon, Carolyn & Sullivan, Charles & Hensher, David A, 2004. "Constraints affecting mode choices by morning car commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 17-29, January.
    8. Mario Cools & Elke Moons & Brecht Janssens & Geert Wets, 2009. "Shifting towards environment-friendly modes: profiling travelers using Q-methodology," Transportation, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 437-453, July.
    9. Ari Tarigan & Stian Bayer & Christin Berg, 2011. "Suburbanisation of employment means less sustainable travel? - The effects of policy location on commuters' travel patterns in the Stavanger region, Norway," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1648, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Habibian, Meeghat & Kermanshah, Mohammad, 2013. "Coping with congestion: Understanding the role of simultaneous transportation demand management policies on commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 229-237.
    11. Cools, Mario & Brijs, Kris & Tormans, Hans & De Laender, Jessie & Wets, Geert, 2012. "Optimizing the implementation of policy measures through social acceptance segmentation," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 80-87.
    12. Bastani, Parisa & Heywood, John B. & Hope, Chris, 2012. "The effect of uncertainty on US transport-related GHG emissions and fuel consumption out to 2050," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 517-548.
    13. Cullinane, S., 2002. "The relationship between car ownership and public transport provision: a case study of Hong Kong," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 29-39, January.
    14. Santos, Georgina & Behrendt, Hannah & Teytelboym, Alexander, 2010. "Part II: Policy instruments for sustainable road transport," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 46-91.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:34:y:2000:i:5:p:321-338. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.