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Constraints affecting mode choices by morning car commuters

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  • O'Fallon, Carolyn
  • Sullivan, Charles
  • Hensher, David A

Abstract

In New Zealand as elsewhere, there is an increasing interest in alleviating congestion on the road transport network to improve economic productivity, reduce pollution, and to use the transport network more effectively. Governments enact various policies to encourage car drivers to change their behaviour, but often find that the full impact is not reached. We propose that car drivers have constraints influencing their mode choice for the morning peak period trip (e.g. needing to transport children, needing a car for work during the day). A stated preference experiment conducted in the three largest New Zealand urban areas not only quantifies the likely impact of a wide range of policy tools (both 'sticks' discouraging car use, and 'carrots' encouraging alternative modes) for each area, but also identifies many significant constraints.

Suggested Citation

  • O'Fallon, Carolyn & Sullivan, Charles & Hensher, David A, 2004. "Constraints affecting mode choices by morning car commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 17-29, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:11:y:2004:i:1:p:17-29
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mackett, R. L., 2001. "Policies to attract drivers out of their cars for short trips," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 295-306, October.
    2. Marshall, Stephen & Banister, David, 2000. "Travel reduction strategies: intentions and outcomes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 321-338, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jessica Ristell & Mohammed Quddus & Marcus Enoch & Chao Wang & Peter Hardy, 2013. "Quantifying the transport-related impacts of parental school choice in England," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 69-90, January.
    2. Agarwal, Sumit & Koo, Kang Mo, 2016. "Impact of electronic road pricing (ERP) changes on transport modal choice," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1-11.
    3. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11116-015-9672-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Khalilikhah, Majid & Habibian, Meeghat & Heaslip, Kevin, 2016. "Acceptability of increasing petrol price as a TDM pricing policy: A case study in Tehran," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 136-144.
    5. repec:eee:transa:v:106:y:2017:i:c:p:440-452 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. De Witte, Astrid & Hollevoet, Joachim & Dobruszkes, Frédéric & Hubert, Michel & Macharis, Cathy, 2013. "Linking modal choice to motility: A comprehensive review," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 329-341.
    7. Habibian, Meeghat & Kermanshah, Mohammad, 2013. "Coping with congestion: Understanding the role of simultaneous transportation demand management policies on commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 229-237.
    8. Li, Zheng & Hensher, David A., 2012. "Congestion charging and car use: A review of stated preference and opinion studies and market monitoring evidence," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 47-61.
    9. Ceder, Avishai & Chowdhury, Subeh & Taghipouran, Nima & Olsen, Jared, 2013. "Modelling public-transport users’ behaviour at connection point," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 112-122.
    10. Thøgersen, John, 2006. "Understanding repetitive travel mode choices in a stable context: A panel study approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 621-638, October.
    11. Chowdhury, Subeh & Ceder, Avishai (Avi), 2016. "Users’ willingness to ride an integrated public-transport service: A literature review," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 183-195.
    12. Hensher, David A. & Li, Zheng, 2013. "Referendum voting in road pricing reform: A review of the evidence," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 186-197.

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