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Understanding the effect of disease adaptation information on general population values for hypothetical health states

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  • McTaggart-Cowan, Helen
  • Tsuchiya, Aki
  • O'Cathain, Alicia
  • Brazier, John

Abstract

It has been recommended that economic evaluation of healthcare technologies should use values for hypothetical health states elicited from the general population rather than patients. The drawback is the general population may not consider the possibility of adapting to the impaired state. This study explored the extent to which the general population changes their initial values, and the factors that influenced this change, after being informed with different disease adaptation techniques. Three rheumatoid arthritis states were used for illustration. General population respondents from the United Kingdom initially valued the states. An adaptation exercise followed, where they listened to recordings of patients discussing how they adapted; they then valued the same states again. The differences between the valuations were examined using t-tests. A multivariate regression model was developed to assess the factors that impacted individuals to change their initial values. After undergoing the adaptation exercise, the respondents increased their values for the rheumatoid arthritis states. Younger and healthier individuals were more likely to increase their initial values after being informed.

Suggested Citation

  • McTaggart-Cowan, Helen & Tsuchiya, Aki & O'Cathain, Alicia & Brazier, John, 2011. "Understanding the effect of disease adaptation information on general population values for hypothetical health states," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(11), pages 1904-1912, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:72:y:2011:i:11:p:1904-1912
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Drummond, Michael F. & Sculpher, Mark J. & Torrance, George W. & O'Brien, Bernie J. & Stoddart, Greg L., 2005. "Methods for the Economic Evaluation of Health Care Programmes," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 3, number 9780198529453.
    2. Claire Gudex, 1994. "Time trade-off user manual: props and self-completion methods," Working Papers 020cheop, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    3. Damschroder, Laura J. & Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. & Ubel, Peter A., 2005. "The impact of considering adaptation in health state valuation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 267-277, July.
    4. Rachel Baker & Angela Robinson, 2004. "Responses to standard gambles: are preferences 'well constructed'?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(1), pages 37-48.
    5. Erik Nord & Jose Luis Pinto & Jeff Richardson & Paul Menzel & Peter Ubel, 1999. "Incorporating societal concerns for fairness in numerical valuations of health programmes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 25-39.
    6. McTaggart-Cowan, H & O'Cathain, A & Tsuchiya, A & Brazier, J, 2009. "A qualitative study exploring the general population’s perception of rheumatoid arthritis after being informed about disease adaptation," MPRA Paper 29836, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Menzel, Paul & Dolan, Paul & Richardson, Jeff & Olsen, Jan Abel, 2002. "The role of adaptation to disability and disease in health state valuation: a preliminary normative analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(12), pages 2149-2158, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dolan, Paul & Kavetsos, Georgios & Tsuchiya, Aki, 2013. "Sick but satisfied: The impact of life and health satisfaction on choice between health scenarios," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 708-714.
    2. Erik Nord & Jose Luis Pinto & Jeff Richardson & Paul Menzel & Peter Ubel, 1999. "Incorporating societal concerns for fairness in numerical valuations of health programmes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 25-39.
    3. Versteegh, M.M. & Brouwer, W.B.F., 2016. "Patient and general public preferences for health states: A call to reconsider current guidelines," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 66-74.

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