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Is precarious employment damaging to self-rated health? Results of propensity score matching methods, using longitudinal data in South Korea

Author

Listed:
  • Kim, Myoung-Hee
  • Kim, Chang-yup
  • Park, Jin-Kyung
  • Kawachi, Ichiro

Abstract

We aimed to evaluate the health effects of precarious employment based on a counterfactual framework, using the Korea Labor and Income Panel Survey data. At the 4th wave (2001), information was obtained on 1991 male and 1378 female waged workers. Precarious work was defined on the basis of workers employed on a temporary or daily basis, part-time, or in a contingent (fixed short-term) job. The outcome was self-rated health with five response categories. Confounding factors included age, marital status, education, industry and occupation of current employment, household income, residential area, and prior health status. Propensity scores for each individual to be a precarious worker were calculated from logistic models including those covariates, and based on them, precarious workers were matched to non-precarious workers. Then, we examined the effects of precarious employment on health and explored the potential intermediary variables, using ordered logistic Generalized Estimating Equations models. All analyses were performed separately by gender. Precarious workers were found to be in a lower socioeconomic position and to have worse health status. Univariate matched analyses showed that precarious employment was associated with worse health in both men and women. By further controlling for socio-demographic covariates, the odds ratios were attenuated but remained significant. Job satisfaction, especially as related to job insecurity, and monthly wage further attenuated the effects. This suggests that to improve health status of precarious workers in Korea, policy strategies need to tackle the channeling of the socially disadvantaged into precarious jobs. Also, regulations to eliminate discrimination against precarious workers in working conditions or material reward should be introduced and enforced. There is no doubt that job insecurity, which is pervasive among workers in Korea, should be minimized by suspending market-oriented labor policies which rely on quantitative flexibility.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Myoung-Hee & Kim, Chang-yup & Park, Jin-Kyung & Kawachi, Ichiro, 2008. "Is precarious employment damaging to self-rated health? Results of propensity score matching methods, using longitudinal data in South Korea," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(12), pages 1982-1994, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:12:p:1982-1994
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Elenka Brenna & Cinzia Novi, 2016. "Is caring for older parents detrimental to women’s mental health? The role of the European North–South gradient," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 745-778, December.
    2. Francesca Modena & Concetta Rondinelli & Fabio Sabatini, 2014. "Economic Insecurity and Fertility Intentions: The Case of Italy," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(S1), pages 233-255, May.
    3. Francesca Modena & Fabio Sabatini, 2012. "I would if I could: precarious employment and childbearing intentions in Italy," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 77-97, March.
    4. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie & DeHaney, Suzanne & Ciampi, Antonio, 2010. "Temporary work and depressive symptoms: A propensity score analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 1982-1987, June.
    5. Gebel, Michael & Voßemer, Jonas, 2014. "The impact of employment transitions on health in Germany. A difference-in-differences propensity score matching approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 128-136.
    6. Pirani, Elena & Salvini, Silvana, 2015. "Is temporary employment damaging to health? A longitudinal study on Italian workers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 121-131.
    7. Kim, Myoung-Hee & Jung-Choi, Kyunghee & Jun, Hee-Jin & Kawachi, Ichiro, 2010. "Socioeconomic inequalities in suicidal ideation, parasuicides, and completed suicides in South Korea," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(8), pages 1254-1261, April.
    8. Nishimura, Junko, 2011. "Socioeconomic status and depression across Japan, Korea, and China: Exploring the impact of labor market structures," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(4), pages 604-614, August.
    9. Kim, Il-Ho & Muntaner, Carles & Vahid Shahidi, Faraz & Vives, Alejandra & Vanroelen, Christophe & Benach, Joan, 2012. "Welfare states, flexible employment, and health: A critical review," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 99-127.
    10. Richardson, Susan (Sue) & Lester, Laurence Howard & Zhang, Guangyu, 2011. "NILS Working paper no 166. Are casual and contract terms of employment hazardous for mental health in Australia?," NILS Working Papers 26069, National Institute of Labour Studies.
    11. Minelli, Liliana & Pigini, Claudia & Chiavarini, Manuela & Bartolucci, Francesco, 2014. "Employment status and perceived health condition: longitudinal data from Italy," MPRA Paper 55788, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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