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Psychosocial factors as mediators between migration and subjective well-being among young Finnish adults

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  • Ek, Ellen
  • Koiranen, Markku
  • Raatikka, Veli-Pekka
  • Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta
  • Taanila, Anja

Abstract

This study examined the role of socioeconomic factors (such as education and employment) and psychosocial factors (such as social support, coping and attitude towards the future), in the relationship between migration, self-reported health and life satisfaction among young adults in a 31-year follow-up study of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 conducted in 1997-1998. The associations between these outcomes and socioeconomic and psychosocial factors were first examined, stratified by gender and migration, for sample members at 23 and at 31 years of age. Regression modelling was then used to study the association between migration and the outcomes after adjusting for specific socioeconomic and psychosocial factors. Results of binary logistic regression models showed that, although there was more dissatisfaction with life and more poor self-reported health in rural areas, the association was derived mostly from the mediation of unemployment, poorer education, lack of social support, passive coping strategies and greater pessimism among people living in rural areas. It is concluded that special attention should be paid to improving living conditions (educational and vocational opportunities) and enhancing the psychosocial resources of young adults in rural and remote areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Ek, Ellen & Koiranen, Markku & Raatikka, Veli-Pekka & Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta & Taanila, Anja, 2008. "Psychosocial factors as mediators between migration and subjective well-being among young Finnish adults," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(7), pages 1545-1556, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:66:y:2008:i:7:p:1545-1556
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mäkinen, Tomi & Laaksonen, Mikko & Lahelma, Eero & Rahkonen, Ossi, 2006. "Associations of childhood circumstances with physical and mental functioning in adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(8), pages 1831-1839, April.
    2. Ecob, Russell & Davey Smith, George, 1999. "Income and health: what is the nature of the relationship?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 48(5), pages 693-705, March.
    3. Sweeting, Helen & West, Patrick, 1995. "Family life and health in adolescence: A role for culture in the health inequalities debate," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 163-175, January.
    4. Ellen Ek & Jouko Remes & Ulla Sovio, 2004. "Social and Developmental Predictors of Optimism from Infancy to Early Adulthood," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 69(2), pages 219-242, November.
    5. Jari Ritsila & Marko Ovaskainen, 2001. "Migration and regional centralization of human capital," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(3), pages 317-325.
    6. Siegrist, Johannes, 2000. "Place, social exchange and health: proposed sociological framework," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 51(9), pages 1283-1293, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nikolova, Milena & Graham, Carol, 2015. "In transit: The well-being of migrants from transition and post-transition countries," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 164-186.
    2. Martijn Hendriks & Kai Ludwigs & Ruut Veenhoven, 2016. "Why are Locals Happier than Internal Migrants? The Role of Daily Life," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(2), pages 481-508, January.
    3. Ellen Ek & Anitta Sirviö & Markku Koiranen & Anja Taanila, 2014. "Psychological Well-Being, Job Strain and Education Among Young Finnish Precarious Employees," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 115(3), pages 1057-1069, February.
    4. Jokela, Markus & Kivimäki, Mika & Elovainio, Marko & Viikari, Jorma & Raitakari, Olli T. & Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa, 2009. "Urban/rural differences in body weight: Evidence for social selection and causation hypotheses in Finland," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 867-875, March.
    5. Hwang, Sean-Shong & Cao, Yue & Xi, Juan, 2010. "Project-induced migration and depression: A panel analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 1765-1772, June.
    6. Artjoms Ivlevs, 2015. "Happy Moves? Assessing the Link between Life Satisfaction and Emigration Intentions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(3), pages 335-356, August.
    7. Linnea Polgreen & Nicole Simpson, 2011. "Happiness and International Migration," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 12(5), pages 819-840, October.
    8. Nicole B. Simpson, 2013. "Happiness and migration," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 21, pages 393-408 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Juan Xi & Sean-Shong Hwang, 2011. "Relocation Stress, Coping, and Sense of Control Among Resettlers Resulting from China’s Three Gorges Dam Project," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 104(3), pages 507-522, December.

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