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Externalities, technological complementarities and sustained economic growth

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  • Carlaw, Kenneth I.
  • Lipsey, Richard G.

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  • Carlaw, Kenneth I. & Lipsey, Richard G., 2002. "Externalities, technological complementarities and sustained economic growth," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(8-9), pages 1305-1315, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:31:y:2002:i:8-9:p:1305-1315
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. D. W. Jorgenson & Z. Griliches, 1967. "The Explanation of Productivity Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(3), pages 249-283.
    2. Rosenberg,Nathan, 1994. "Exploring the Black Box," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521459556, March.
    3. Kenneth Arrow, 1962. "Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention," NBER Chapters,in: The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity: Economic and Social Factors, pages 609-626 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Susanna Mancinelli & Massimiliano Mazzanti, 2009. "Innovation, networking and complementarity: evidence on SME performances for a local economic system in North-Eastern Italy," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 43(3), pages 567-597, September.
    2. Stanley, T. D. & Doucouliagos, Chris & Steel, Piers, 2015. "Does ICT generate economic growth? A meta-regression analysis," Working Papers eco_2015_9, Deakin University, Department of Economics.
    3. Basmann, Robert L. & McAleer, Michael & Slottje, Daniel, 2007. "Patent activity and technical change," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 139(2), pages 355-375, August.
    4. Breandán Ó hUallacháin & Timothy F. Leslie, 2007. "Rethinking the regional knowledge production function," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(6), pages 737-752, November.
    5. G. Silverberg, 2007. "Long Waves: Conceptual, Empirical and Modelling Issues," Chapters,in: Elgar Companion to Neo-Schumpeterian Economics, chapter 50 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Szalavetz, Andrea, 2004. "Technológiai fejlődés, szakosodás, komplementaritás, szerkezetátalakulás
      [Technological development, technological complementarity and structural change]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(4), pages 362-378.
    7. Maroto Sánchez, Andrés & Rubalcaba Bermejo, Luis & Gallego Martinez, Jorge, 2016. "On the role of publicly funded R&D for public sector performance," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2016/02, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
    8. Fischer, Manfred M. & Scherngell, Thomas & Jansenberger, Eva, 2005. "The Geography of Knowledge Spillovers between High-Technology Firms in Europe. Evidence from a Spatial Interaction Modelling Perspective," MPRA Paper 77786, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Les T. Oxley & Kenneth I. Carlaw, 2004. "ICT Diffusion and Economic Growth in New Zealand," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 167, Econometric Society.
    10. Liao, Hailin & Wang, Bin & Li, Baibing & Weyman-Jones, Tom, 2016. "ICT as a general-purpose technology: The productivity of ICT in the United States revisited," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 10-25.
    11. Autio, Erkko & Kanninen, Sami & Gustafsson, Robin, 2008. "First- and second-order additionality and learning outcomes in collaborative R&D programs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 59-76, February.
    12. Paul Beaudry & David A. Green & Benjamin M. Sand, 2016. "The Great Reversal in the Demand for Skill and Cognitive Tasks," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(S1), pages 199-247.
    13. Koutroumpis, Pantelis & Leiponen, Aija & Thomas, Llewellyn D W, 2017. "Invention Machines: How Control Instruments and Information Technologies Drove Global Technologigal Progress over a Century of Invention," ETLA Working Papers 52, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    14. Marco Capasso & Nelson Correa, 2010. "ICT and Knowledge Complementarities: A Factor Analysis on Growth," Chapters,in: Innovation and Economic Development, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Clifford Bekar & Kenneth Carlaw & Richard Lipsey, 2016. "General Purpose Technologies in Theory, Applications and Controversy: A Review," Discussion Papers dp16-15, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
    16. Richard G. Lipsey & Murray G. Smith, 2011. "Multilateral versus Regional Trading Arrangements: Substitutes or Complements?," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Integration, Volume I, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Carlaw, Kenneth I. & Oxley, Les, 2008. "Resolving the productivity paradox," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 313-318.
    18. Gustafsson, Robin & Autio, Erkko, 2011. "A failure trichotomy in knowledge exploration and exploitation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 819-831, July.
    19. Richard G. Lipsey, 2013. "Some contentious issues in theory and policy in memory of Mark Blaug," Chapters,in: Mark Blaug: Rebel with Many Causes, chapter 6, pages 31-62 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    20. Giulio Cainelli & Massimiliano Mazzanti & Roberto Zoboli, 2011. "Enviromental Innovations, Complementarity and Local/Global Cooperation," Working Papers 201104, University of Ferrara, Department of Economics.

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