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Do demand curves for stocks slope down?: Evidence from aggregate data

  • Xing, Xuejing
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    We examine whether the aggregate demand curve for stocks is downward sloping. As a proxy for aggregate demand, we use net outflows (dividends plus repurchases less net issues) from the stock market scaled by the previous year's market capitalization. To disentangle the information and price pressure effects from the demand curve effects, we use an information-free demographic variable as an instrument and look at the relation between annual changes in aggregate demand and excess market return. We find that information-free changes in the annual aggregate demand for stocks do not lead to changes in the annual excess market return. This finding supports long-term horizontal demand curves for stocks.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance.

    Volume (Year): 48 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 3 (August)
    Pages: 641-651

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:48:y:2008:i:3:p:641-651
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620167

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