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On the strategic use of risk and undesirable goods in multidimensional screening


  • Lachapelle, A.
  • Santambrogio, F.


A monopolist sells goods possibly with a characteristic consumers dislike (for instance, he sells random goods to risk averse agents), which does not affect the production costs. We investigate the question whether using undesirable goods is profitable to the seller. We prove that in general this may be the case, depending somehow on the correlation between agent types and aversion. This is due to screening effects that outperform this aversion. We analyze, in a continuous framework, several multidimensional cases.

Suggested Citation

  • Lachapelle, A. & Santambrogio, F., 2011. "On the strategic use of risk and undesirable goods in multidimensional screening," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(6), pages 698-705.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:mateco:v:47:y:2011:i:6:p:698-705 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmateco.2011.09.004

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Jean-Charles Rochet & Philippe Chone, 1998. "Ironing, Sweeping, and Multidimensional Screening," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(4), pages 783-826, July.
    7. Eric Maskin & John Riley, 1984. "Monopoly with Incomplete Information," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 15(2), pages 171-196, Summer.
    8. McAfee, R. Preston, 2007. "Pricing Damaged Goods," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 1, pages 1-19.
    9. Raymond J. Deneckere & R. Preston McAfee, 1996. "Damaged Goods," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(2), pages 149-174, June.
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