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Is risk-aversion hereditary?


  • Levy, Moshe


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  • Levy, Moshe, 2005. "Is risk-aversion hereditary?," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1-2), pages 157-168, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:mateco:v:41:y:2005:i:1-2:p:157-168

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mehra, Rajnish & Prescott, Edward C., 1985. "The equity premium: A puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 145-161, March.
    2. Grafen, Alan, 2000. "A biological approach to economics through fertility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 241-248, March.
    3. Larry Samuelson, 2002. "Evolution and Game Theory," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 47-66, Spring.
    4. Tversky, Amos & Kahneman, Daniel, 1992. "Advances in Prospect Theory: Cumulative Representation of Uncertainty," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 297-323, October.
    5. Theodore C. Bergstrom, 2002. "Evolution of Social Behavior: Individual and Group Selection," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 67-88, Spring.
    6. Harry Markowitz, 1952. "The Utility of Wealth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60, pages 151-151.
    7. Marc Oliver Bettzüge & Thorsten Hens, 2001. "An Evolutionary Approach to Financial Innovation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(3), pages 493-522.
    8. Robson, Arthur J., 1996. "A Biological Basis for Expected and Non-expected Utility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 397-424, February.
    9. Levy, Moshe, 2003. "Are rich people smarter?," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 110(1), pages 42-64, May.
    10. Dekel, Eddie & Scotchmer, Suzanne, 1999. "On the Evolution of Attitudes towards Risk in Winner-Take-All Games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 125-143, July.
    11. John Lintner, 1965. "Security Prices, Risk, And Maximal Gains From Diversification," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 20(4), pages 587-615, December.
    12. Richard R. Nelson & Sidney G. Winter, 2002. "Evolutionary Theorizing in Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 23-46, Spring.
    13. Javier Díaz-Giménez & Vincenzo Quadrini & José-Víctor Ríos-Rull, 1997. "Dimensions of inequality: facts on the U.S. distributions of earnings, income, and wealth," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Spr, pages 3-21.
    14. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    15. William F. Sharpe, 1964. "Capital Asset Prices: A Theory Of Market Equilibrium Under Conditions Of Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 19(3), pages 425-442, September.
    16. Moshe Levy & Haim Levy, 2002. "Prospect Theory: Much Ado About Nothing?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 48(10), pages 1334-1349, October.
    17. Boulding, K E, 1991. "What Is Evolutionary Economics?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 9-17, January.
    18. Milton Friedman & L. J. Savage, 1948. "The Utility Analysis of Choices Involving Risk," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 279-279.
    19. Samuelson, Larry, 1993. "Recent advances in evolutionary economics: comments," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 42(2-3), pages 313-319.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barnea, Amir & Cronqvist, Henrik & Siegel, Stephan, 2010. "Nature or nurture: What determines investor behavior?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(3), pages 583-604, December.
    2. Paolo Pin, 2006. "Selection matters," Working Papers 138, Department of Applied Mathematics, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia.
    3. Hens, Thorsten & Schenk-Hoppe, Klaus Reiner, 2005. "Evolutionary finance: introduction to the special issue," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1-2), pages 1-5, February.
    4. Olivier Brandouy & Philippe Mathieu & Iryna Veryzhenko, 2012. "Risk Aversion Impact on Investment Strategy Performance: A Multi Agent-Based Analysis," Post-Print hal-00826144, HAL.

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