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Measuring the Liquidity Effect: The Case of Japan

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  • Uesugi, Iichiro

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  • Uesugi, Iichiro, 2002. "Measuring the Liquidity Effect: The Case of Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 289-316, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jjieco:v:16:y:2002:i:3:p:289-316
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    1. Hamilton, James D, 1997. "Measuring the Liquidity Effect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 80-97, March.
    2. Feinman, Joshua N, 1993. "Estimating the Open Market Desk's Daily Reaction Function," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 25(2), pages 231-247, May.
    3. Stephen G. Cecchetti, 1995. "Distinguishing theories of the monetary transmission mechanism," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 83-97.
    4. Leeper, Eric M. & Gordon, David B., 1992. "In search of the liquidity effect," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 341-369, June.
    5. Hamilton, James D, 1996. "The Daily Market for Federal Funds," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(1), pages 26-56, February.
    6. Rudebusch, Glenn D, 1998. "Do Measures of Monetary Policy in a VAR Make Sense? A Reply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 943-948, November.
    7. Furfine, Craig H., 2000. "Interbank payments and the daily federal funds rate," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 535-553, October.
    8. Hamilton, James D., 1998. "The supply and demand for Federal Reserve deposits," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 1-44, December.
    9. Hayashi, Fumio, 2001. "Identifying a Liquidity Effect in the Japanese Interbank Market," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(2), pages 287-315, May.
    10. Fuerst, Timothy S., 1992. "Liquidity, loanable funds, and real activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 3-24, February.
    11. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1984. "A Monetary Equilibrium Model with Transactions Costs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(1), pages 40-58, February.
    12. Peter R. Fisher & R. Spence Hilton, 1999. "Highlights of domestic open market operations during 1998," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Apr, pages 217-235.
    13. Rudebusch, Glenn D, 1998. "Do Measures of Monetary Policy in a VAR Make Sense?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 907-931, November.
    14. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1990. "Liquidity and interest rates," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 237-264, April.
    15. Kunio Okina, 1993. "Market Operations in Japan: Theory and Practice," NBER Chapters, in: Japanese Monetary Policy, pages 31-62, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Strongin, Steven, 1995. "The identification of monetary policy disturbances explaining the liquidity puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 463-497, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chang, Su-Hsin & Contessi, Silvio & Francis, Johanna L., 2014. "Understanding the accumulation of bank and thrift reserves during the U.S. financial crisis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 78-106.
    2. Jérôme Vandenbussche & Stanley B Watt & Szabolcs Blazsek, 2009. "The Liquidity and Liquidity Distribution Effects in Emerging Markets; The Case of Jordan," IMF Working Papers 2009/228, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Kazuo Ogawa, 2007. "Why Commercial Banks Held Excess Reserves: The Japanese Experience of the Late 1990s," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(1), pages 241-257, February.
    4. Fukunaga, Ichiro & Kato, Naoya, 2016. "Japanese repo and call markets before, during, and emerging from the financial crisis," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 17-34.
    5. Friedman, Benjamin M. & Kuttner, Kenneth N., 2010. "Implementation of Monetary Policy: How Do Central Banks Set Interest Rates?," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 24, pages 1345-1438, Elsevier.
    6. Garett Jones, 2006. "The liquidity effect across the short end of the term structure," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 2(3), pages 159-163, May.
    7. Kazuo Ogawa, 2007. "Why Commercial Banks Held Excess Reserves: The Japanese Experience of the Late 1990s," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(1), pages 241-257, February.

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