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Why Commercial Banks Held Excess Reserves: The Japanese Experience of the Late 1990s

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  • KAZUO OGAWA

Abstract

We investigated, empirically, why Japanese banks held excess reserves in the late 1990s. Specifically, we pin down two factors explaining the demand for excess reserves: a low short-term interest rate, or call rate, and the fragile financial health of banks. The virtually zero call rate increased the demand for excess reserves substantially, and a high bad loans ratio largely contributed to the increase in excess reserve holdings. We found that the holdings of excess reserves would fall by two-thirds if the call rate were to be raised to its level prior to the adoption of the zero-interest-rate policy, and the bad loans ratio were to fall by 50%. Copyright 2007 The Ohio State University.

Suggested Citation

  • Kazuo Ogawa, 2007. "Why Commercial Banks Held Excess Reserves: The Japanese Experience of the Late 1990s," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(1), pages 241-257, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:39:y:2007:i:1:p:241-257
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    1. Hans Dewachter & Marco Lyrio & Konstantijn Maes, 2001. "Estimation of a Joint Model for the Term Structure of Interest Rates and the Macroeconomy," International Economics Working Papers Series ces0118, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiƫn, International Economics.
    2. Ang, Andrew & Piazzesi, Monika, 2003. "A no-arbitrage vector autoregression of term structure dynamics with macroeconomic and latent variables," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 745-787, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lagoarde-Segot, Thomas & Leoni, Patrick L., 2013. "Pandemics of the poor and banking stability," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4574-4583.
    2. Khemraj, Tarron, 2011. "The Non-Zero Lower Bound Lending Rate and the Liquidity Trap," MPRA Paper 42030, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 May 2012.
    3. Chang, Su-Hsin & Contessi, Silvio & Francis, Johanna L., 2014. "Understanding the accumulation of bank and thrift reserves during the U.S. financial crisis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 78-106.
    4. Festic, Mejra & Kavkler, Alenka, 2012. "The Roots of the Banking Crisis in the New EU Member States: A Panel Regression Approach," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(1), pages 20-40, March.
    5. Masami Imai, 2008. "Crowding-Out Effects of a Government-Owned Depository Institution: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Japan," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2008-003, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
    6. Bowman, David & Cai, Fang & Davies, Sally & Kamin, Steven, 2015. "Quantitative easing and bank lending: Evidence from Japan," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 15-30.
    7. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2013. "Contained Crisis and Socialized Risk: Unconventional Monetary Policy by the Bank of Japan in the 1890s," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f165, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 02 Aug 2016.

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