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Do foreign-owned banks affect banking system liquidity risk?

  • Dinger, Valeriya

Existing empirical research shows that foreign-owned banks play a stabilizing role in emerging economies' banking systems. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this stabilizing role can be attributed to transnational banks' access to more diversified sources of liquidity. There exists, however, no empirical evidence so far on transnational banks' liquidity behavior and its effect on aggregate banking system liquidity. This paper aims at closing this gap. First, we look at the liquid assets holdings of transnational banks and show that in "normal" times they are significantly lower but in crises times higher than those of single-market banks. Second, we find evidence that transnational banks' presence significantly reduces the risk of aggregate liquidity shortages in emerging economies.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Comparative Economics.

Volume (Year): 37 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 647-657

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:37:y:2009:i:4:p:647-657
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  1. Freixas, X. & Holthausen, C., 2001. "Interbank Market Integration under Asymmetric Information," Papers 74, Quebec a Montreal - Recherche en gestion.
  2. Richard Blundell & Steve Bond, 1995. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," IFS Working Papers W95/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  3. Carletti, Elena & Hartmann, Philipp & Spagnolo, Giancarlo, 2006. "Bank mergers, competition and liquidity," CFS Working Paper Series 2006/08, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  4. Detragiache, Enrica & Gupta, Poonam, 2006. "Foreign banks in emerging market crises: Evidence from Malaysia," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 217-242, October.
  5. Claeys, Sophie & Hainz, Christa, 2006. "Acquisition versus greenfield: The impact of the mode of foreign bank entry on information and bank lending rates," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 182, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
  6. Buch, Claudia M. & Lipponer, Alexander, 2007. "FDI versus exports: Evidence from German banks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 805-826, March.
  7. von Hagen, Jürgen & Ho, Tai-kuang, 2004. "Money market pressure and the determinants of baning crises," ZEI Working Papers B 20-2004, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies, University of Bonn.
  8. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
  9. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2002. "Liquidity Shortages and Banking Crises," NBER Working Papers 8937, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Bengt Holmstrom & Jean Tirole, 1998. "Private and Public Supply of Liquidity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(1), pages 1-40, February.
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