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When do materialistic consumers join commercial sharing systems

Author

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  • Akbar, Payam
  • Mai, Robert
  • Hoffmann, Stefan

Abstract

Commercial sharing systems (CSS) evolve to a relevant business concept that provides access to product benefits without ownership. A series of three studies delivers new knowledge on how to target consumers who still refrain from sharing to widen the market potential of CSS. Study 1 demonstrates that materialism's sub-dimension possessiveness is the dominant inhibitor of sharing. Study 2 then confirms that this negative impact of materialism diminishes with elevating levels of the desire for unique consumer products. Study 3 reveals that this interaction effect is further qualified by the ownership of a product if the product category has a strong product-need-fit. This research outlines implications of how marketers can design CSS so that they are also attractive to the critical target segment of materialistic consumers.

Suggested Citation

  • Akbar, Payam & Mai, Robert & Hoffmann, Stefan, 2016. "When do materialistic consumers join commercial sharing systems," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(10), pages 4215-4224.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:69:y:2016:i:10:p:4215-4224
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2016.03.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Youn Kue Na & Sungmin Kang & Hye Yeon Jeong, 2019. "Sub-Network Structure and Information Diffusion Behaviors in a Sustainable Fashion Sharing Economy Platform," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(12), pages 1-21, June.
    2. Lutz, Christoph & Newlands, Gemma, 2018. "Consumer segmentation within the sharing economy: The case of Airbnb," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 187-196.
    3. Katarzyna Grondys, 2019. "Implementation of the Sharing Economy in the B2B Sector," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(14), pages 1-16, July.
    4. Lindblom, Arto & Lindblom, Taru & Wechtler, Heidi, 2018. "Collaborative consumption as C2C trading: Analyzing the effects of materialism and price consciousness," Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 244-252.
    5. Florian Hawlitschek & Nicole Stofberg & Timm Teubner & Patrick Tu & Christof Weinhardt, 2018. "How Corporate Sharewashing Practices Undermine Consumer Trust," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(8), pages 1-18, July.
    6. Hackbarth, André & Löbbe, Sabine, 2020. "Attitudes, preferences, and intentions of German households concerning participation in peer-to-peer electricity trading," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 138(C).
    7. Hüttel, Alexandra & Balderjahn, Ingo & Hoffmann, Stefan, 2020. "Welfare Beyond Consumption: The Benefits of Having Less," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 176(C).
    8. Hackbarth, André, 2018. "Attitudes, preferences, and intentions of German households concerning participation in peer-to-peer electricity trading," Reutlingen Working Papers on Marketing & Management 2019-2, Reutlingen University, ESB Business School.
    9. Gupta, Manjul & Esmaeilzadeh, Pouyan & Uz, Irem & Tennant, Vanesa M., 2019. "The effects of national cultural values on individuals' intention to participate in peer-to-peer sharing economy," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 20-29.
    10. Murillo, David & Buckland, Heloise & Val, Esther, 2017. "When the sharing economy becomes neoliberalism on steroids: Unravelling the controversies," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 66-76.
    11. Meisam Ranjbari & Gustavo Morales-Alonso & Ruth Carrasco-Gallego, 2018. "Conceptualizing the Sharing Economy through Presenting a Comprehensive Framework," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(7), pages 1-24, July.
    12. Milanova, Veselina & Maas, Peter, 2017. "Sharing intangibles: Uncovering individual motives for engagement in a sharing service setting," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 159-171.
    13. Youn Kue Na & Sungmin Kang, 2018. "Effects of Core Resource and Competence Characteristics of Sharing Economy Business on Shared Value, Distinctive Competitive Advantage, and Behavior Intention," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(10), pages 1-17, September.
    14. Juana Camacho-Otero & Casper Boks & Ida Nilstad Pettersen, 2018. "Consumption in the Circular Economy: A Literature Review," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(8), pages 1-25, August.
    15. Francesca De Canio & Davide Pellegrini & Elisa Martinelli, 2018. "Is the collaborative consumption the new buying? Social and economic aspects influencing collaborative consumption," MERCATI E COMPETITIVIT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2018(1), pages 19-38.

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