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Asset allocation: How much does model choice matter?

  • Branger, Nicole
  • Hansis, Alexandra
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    This paper analyzes the optimal portfolio decision of a CRRA investor in models with stochastic volatility and stochastic jumps. The investor follows a buy-and-hold strategy in the stock, the money market account, and one additional derivative. We show that both the type of the model and the structure of the risk premia have a significant impact on the optimal portfolio, on the utility gain from having access to derivatives, and on whether the investor prefers to trade OTM or ATM options. We also show that model mis-specification results in significant utility losses. Omitting jumps in volatility can be devastating, in particular if the investor chooses the seemingly optimal OTM put options. A misestimation of the structure of the risk premia has a less devastating effect, but can still lead to a loss of around 4% in the annual certainty equivalent return.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Banking & Finance.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 7 ()
    Pages: 1865-1882

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:36:y:2012:i:7:p:1865-1882
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    1. Charles Quanwei Cao & Gurdip S. Bakshi & Zhiwu Chen, 1997. "Empirical Performance of Alternative Option Pricing Models," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm65, Yale School of Management.
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    8. Mark Broadie & Mikhail Chernov & Michael Johannes, 2007. "Model Specification and Risk Premia: Evidence from Futures Options," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(3), pages 1453-1490, 06.
    9. Heston, Steven L, 1993. "A Closed-Form Solution for Options with Stochastic Volatility with Applications to Bond and Currency Options," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(2), pages 327-43.
    10. Nicole Branger & Beate Breuer & Christian Schlag, 2010. "Discrete-time implementation of continuous-time portfolio strategies," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 137-152.
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    12. Bates, David S, 1996. "Jumps and Stochastic Volatility: Exchange Rate Processes Implicit in Deutsche Mark Options," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 9(1), pages 69-107.
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    16. Joost Driessen & Pascal Maenhout, 2007. "An Empirical Portfolio Perspective on Option Pricing Anomalies," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 11(4), pages 561-603.
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