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Early career grants, performance, and careers: A study on predictive validity of grant decisions

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  • van den Besselaar, Peter
  • Sandström, Ulf

Abstract

The main rationale behind career grants is helping top talent to develop into the next generation leading scientists. Does career grant competition result in the selection of the best young talents? In this paper we investigate whether the selected applicants are indeed performing at the expected excellent level—something that is hardly investigated in the research literature.

Suggested Citation

  • van den Besselaar, Peter & Sandström, Ulf, 2015. "Early career grants, performance, and careers: A study on predictive validity of grant decisions," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 826-838.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:infome:v:9:y:2015:i:4:p:826-838
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joi.2015.07.011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jörg Neufeld & Stefan Hornbostel, 2012. "Funding programmes for young scientists--Do the 'best' apply?," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(4), pages 270-279, September.
    2. Meike Olbrecht & Lutz Bornmann, 2010. "Panel peer review of grant applications: what do we know from research in social psychology on judgment and decision-making in groups?," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 293-304, October.
    3. Bornmann, Lutz & Leydesdorff, Loet & Van den Besselaar, Peter, 2010. "A meta-evaluation of scientific research proposals: Different ways of comparing rejected to awarded applications," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 211-220.
    4. Waltman, Ludo & van Eck, Nees Jan & Wouters, Paul, 2013. "Counting publications and citations: Is more always better?," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 635-641.
    5. Esser, James K., 1998. "Alive and Well after 25 Years: A Review of Groupthink Research," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 73(2-3), pages 116-141, February.
    6. Ulf Sandström & Erik Sandström, 2009. "The field factor: towards a metric for academic institutions," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(3), pages 243-250, September.
    7. Jörg Neufeld & Markus von Ins, 2011. "Informed peer review and uninformed bibliometrics?," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 31-46, March.
    8. Waltman, Ludo & van Eck, Nees Jan, 2013. "A systematic empirical comparison of different approaches for normalizing citation impact indicators," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 833-849.
    9. Peter van den Besselaar & Loet Leydesdorff, 2009. "Past performance, peer review and project selection: a case study in the social and behavioral sciences," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(4), pages 273-288, October.
    10. Pleun van Arensbergen & Inge van der Weijden & Peter van den Besselaar, 2014. "The selection of talent as a group process. A literature review on the social dynamics of decision making in grant panels," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(4), pages 298-311.
    11. Thed N. van Leeuwen & Henk F. Moed, 2012. "Funding decisions, peer review, and scientific excellence in physical sciences, chemistry, and geosciences," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(3), pages 189-198, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter van den Besselaar & Ulf Sandström, 2016. "Gender differences in research performance and its impact on careers: a longitudinal case study," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 106(1), pages 143-162, January.
    2. Kevin W. Boyack & Caleb Smith & Richard Klavans, 2018. "Toward predicting research proposal success," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 114(2), pages 449-461, February.
    3. Peter van den Besselaar & Ulf Sandström & Hélène Schiffbaenker, 2018. "Studying grant decision-making: a linguistic analysis of review reports," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 117(1), pages 313-329, October.
    4. Sandström, Ulf & Van den Besselaar, Peter, 2018. "Funding, evaluation, and the performance of national research systems," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 365-384.

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