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Electricity demand in Tunisia

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  • Gam, Imen
  • Ben Rejeb, Jaleleddine

Abstract

This paper examines the global electricity demand in Tunisia as a function of gross domestic product in constant price, the degree of urbanization, the average annual temperature, and the real electricity price per Kwh. This demand will be examined employing annual data over a period spanning almost thirty one years from 1976 to 2006. A long run relationship between the variables under consideration is determined using the Vector Autoregressive Regression. The empirical results suggest that the electricity demand in Tunisia is sensitive to its past value, any changes in gross domestic product and electricity price. The electricity price effects have a negative impact on long-run electricity consumption. However, the gross domestic product and the past value of electricity consumption have a positive effect. Moreover, the causality test reveals a unidirectional relationship between price and electricity consumption. Our empirical findings are effective to policy makers to maintain the electricity consumption in Tunisia by using the appropriate strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Gam, Imen & Ben Rejeb, Jaleleddine, 2012. "Electricity demand in Tunisia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 714-720.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:45:y:2012:i:c:p:714-720
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2012.03.025
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Liddle, Brantley & Lung, Sidney, 2013. "Might electricity consumption cause urbanization instead? Evidence from heterogeneous panel long-run causality tests," MPRA Paper 52333, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Adom, Philip Kofi, 2017. "The long-run price sensitivity dynamics of industrial and residential electricity demand: The impact of deregulating electricity prices," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 43-60.
    3. Mehdi Abid & Rafaa Mraihi, 2015. "Disaggregate Energy Consumption Versus Economic Growth in Tunisia: Cointegration and Structural Break Analysis," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 6(4), pages 1104-1122, December.
    4. Desiderio Romero-Jordán & Pablo del Río & Cristina Peñasco, 2014. "Household electricity demand in Spanish regions. Public policy implications," Working Papers 2014/24, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    5. repec:eee:energy:v:134:y:2017:i:c:p:902-918 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Khraief, Naceur & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Mallick, Hrushikesh & Loganathan, Nanthakumar, 2016. "Estimation of Electricity Demand Function for Algeria: Revisit of Time Series Analysis," MPRA Paper 74870, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Nov 2016.

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