IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Household consumption, associated fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Greece between 1990 and 2006


  • Papathanasopoulou, Eleni


This paper explores how Greece's household consumption has changed between 1990 and 2006 and its environmental implications in terms of fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The results show that the 44% increase in Greece's household expenditure between 1990 and 2006 was accompanied by a 67% increase in fossil fuel demand. Of this total, indirect demand accounted for approximately 60% throughout the 16-year period, increasing by 56% overall, whereas direct fossil fuel demand grew by 80%. The results also show that associated CO2 emissions increased by 60%, resulting in a "relative decoupling" from energy demand. This relative decoupling is shown to be due to fossil fuel mix changes from the supply side rather than action from consumers. These insights highlight the opportunities for demand-side policies to further reduce fossil fuel demand and CO2 emissions, allowing Greece to set more proactive and ambitious post-Kyoto targets.

Suggested Citation

  • Papathanasopoulou, Eleni, 2010. "Household consumption, associated fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Greece between 1990 and 2006," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4152-4162, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:8:p:4152-4162

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Park, Hi-Chun & Heo, Eunnyeong, 2007. "The direct and indirect household energy requirements in the Republic of Korea from 1980 to 2000--An input-output analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 2839-2851, May.
    2. P Ekins, 1997. "The Kuznets Curve for the Environment and Economic Growth: Examining the Evidence," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 29(5), pages 805-830, May.
    3. Tukker, Arnold & Poliakov, Evgueni & Heijungs, Reinout & Hawkins, Troy & Neuwahl, Frederik & Rueda-Cantuche, José M. & Giljum, Stefan & Moll, Stephan & Oosterhaven, Jan & Bouwmeester, Maaike, 2009. "Towards a global multi-regional environmentally extended input-output database," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 1928-1937, May.
    4. Vringer, Kees & Blok, Kornelis, 1995. "The direct and indirect energy requirements of households in the Netherlands," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(10), pages 893-910, October.
    5. Kaldellis, J.K. & El-Samani, K. & Koronakis, P., 2005. "Feasibility analysis of domestic solar water heating systems in Greece," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 659-682.
    6. Papathanasopoulou, Eleni & Jackson, Tim, 2008. "Fossil resource trade balances: Emerging trends for the UK," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2-3), pages 492-505, June.
    7. Jensen, Jesper Ole, 2008. "Measuring consumption in households: Interpretations and strategies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1-2), pages 353-361, December.
    8. Jackson, Tim & Papathanasopoulou, Eleni, 2008. "Luxury or 'lock-in'? An exploration of unsustainable consumption in the UK: 1968 to 2000," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1-2), pages 80-95, December.
    9. Bin, Shui & Dowlatabadi, Hadi, 2005. "Consumer lifestyle approach to US energy use and the related CO2 emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 197-208, January.
    10. P Ekins, 1997. "The Kuznets curve for the environment and economic growth: examining the evidence," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 29(5), pages 805-830, May.
    11. Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika & Ekstrom, Marianne Pipping & Shanahan, Helena, 2003. "Food and life cycle energy inputs: consequences of diet and ways to increase efficiency," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2-3), pages 293-307, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:appene:v:207:y:2017:i:c:p:520-532 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Dai, Hancheng & Masui, Toshihiko & Matsuoka, Yuzuru & Fujimori, Shinichiro, 2012. "The impacts of China’s household consumption expenditure patterns on energy demand and carbon emissions towards 2050," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 736-750.
    3. Zhu, Qin & Peng, Xizhe & Wu, Kaiya, 2012. "Calculation and decomposition of indirect carbon emissions from residential consumption in China based on the input–output model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 618-626.
    4. Xiao-Wei Ma & Jia Du & Meng-Ying Zhang & Yi Ye, 2016. "Indirect carbon emissions from household consumption between China and the USA: based on an input–output model," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 84(1), pages 399-410, November.
    5. Papathanasopoulou, Eleni & Beaumont, Nicola & Hooper, Tara & Nunes, Joana & Queirós, Ana M., 2015. "Energy systems and their impacts on marine ecosystem services," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 917-926.
    6. Ou, Xunmin & Xiaoyu, Yan & Zhang, Xiliang, 2011. "Life-cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions for electricity generation and supply in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 289-297, January.
    7. Mondol, Jayanta Deb & Koumpetsos, Nikos, 2013. "Overview of challenges, prospects, environmental impacts and policies for renewable energy and sustainable development in Greece," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 431-442.
    8. Theodoridou, Ifigeneia & Karteris, Marinos & Mallinis, Georgios & Papadopoulos, Agis M. & Hegger, Manfred, 2012. "Assessment of retrofitting measures and solar systems' potential in urban areas using Geographical Information Systems: Application to a Mediterranean city," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(8), pages 6239-6261.
    9. Roinioti, Argiro & Koroneos, Christopher & Wangensteen, Ivar, 2012. "Modeling the Greek energy system: Scenarios of clean energy use and their implications," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 711-722.
    10. Girard, Aymeric & Gago, Eulalia Jadraque & Muneer, Tariq & Caceres, Gustavo, 2015. "Higher ground source heat pump COP in a residential building through the use of solar thermal collectors," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 26-39.
    11. Markaki, M. & Belegri-Roboli, A. & Sarafidis, Υ. & Mirasgedis, S., 2017. "The carbon footprint of Greek households (1995–2012)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 206-215.
    12. Sharma, Susan Sunila, 2011. "Determinants of carbon dioxide emissions: Empirical evidence from 69 countries," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 376-382, January.
    13. David C Broadstock & Eleni Papathanasopoulou, 2013. "Gasoline demand in Greece: the importance of shifts in the underlying energy demand trend," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 141, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:8:p:4152-4162. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.