IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/enepol/v37y2009i6p2375-2384.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Factors affecting CO2 emission from the power sector of selected countries in Asia and the Pacific

Author

Listed:
  • Shrestha, Ram M.
  • Anandarajah, Gabrial
  • Liyanage, Migara H.

Abstract

This study analyzes the key factors behind the CO2 emissions from the power sector in fifteen selected countries in Asia and the Pacific using the Log-Mean Divisia Index method of decomposition. The roles of changes in economic output, electricity intensity of the economy, fuel intensity of power generation and generation structure are examined in the evolution of CO2 emission from the power sector of the selected countries during 1980-2004. The study shows that the economic growth was the dominant factor behind the increase in CO2 emission in ten of the selected countries (i.e., Australia, China, India, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, while the increasing electricity intensity of the economy was the main factor in three countries (Bangladesh, Indonesia and Philippines). Structural changes in power generation were found to be the main contributor to changes in the CO2 emission in the case of Sri Lanka and New Zealand.

Suggested Citation

  • Shrestha, Ram M. & Anandarajah, Gabrial & Liyanage, Migara H., 2009. "Factors affecting CO2 emission from the power sector of selected countries in Asia and the Pacific," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2375-2384, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:6:p:2375-2384
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301-4215(09)00066-4
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ang, B.W & Zhang, F.Q & Choi, Ki-Hong, 1998. "Factorizing changes in energy and environmental indicators through decomposition," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 489-495.
    2. Ang, B. W. & Choi, Ki-Hong, 2002. "Boundary problem in carbon emission decomposition," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(13), pages 1201-1205, October.
    3. B. W. Ang & Ki-Hong Choi, 1997. "Decomposition of Aggregate Energy and Gas Emission Intensities for Industry: A Refined Divisia Index Method," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 59-73.
    4. Shrestha, Ram M. & Timilsina, Govinda R., 1996. "Factors affecting CO2 intensities of power sector in Asia: A Divisia decomposition analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 283-293, October.
    5. Ang, B.W. & Liu, F.L., 2001. "A new energy decomposition method: perfect in decomposition and consistent in aggregation," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 537-548.
    6. Ang, B.W. & Zhang, F.Q., 2000. "A survey of index decomposition analysis in energy and environmental studies," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 25(12), pages 1149-1176.
    7. Ang, B.W. & Liu, Na, 2007. "Handling zero values in the logarithmic mean Divisia index decomposition approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 238-246, January.
    8. Wood, Richard & Lenzen, Manfred, 2006. "Zero-value problems of the logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 1326-1331, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Fernández González, P. & Landajo, M. & Presno, M.J., 2014. "Tracking European Union CO2 emissions through LMDI (logarithmic-mean Divisia index) decomposition. The activity revaluation approach," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 741-750.
    2. Hanif, Imran & Faraz Raza, Syed Muhammad & Gago-de-Santos, Pilar & Abbas, Qaiser, 2019. "Fossil fuels, foreign direct investment, and economic growth have triggered CO2 emissions in emerging Asian economies: Some empirical evidence," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 493-501.
    3. Vaninsky, Alexander, 2014. "Factorial decomposition of CO2 emissions: A generalized Divisia index approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 389-400.
    4. Yang, Jing & Song, Kaihui & Hou, Jian & Zhang, Peidong & Wu, Jinhu, 2017. "Temporal and spacial dynamics of bioenergy-related CO2 emissions and underlying forces analysis in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 1323-1330.
    5. Lin Zhu & Lichun He & Peipei Shang & Yingchun Zhang & Xiaojun Ma, 2018. "Influencing Factors and Scenario Forecasts of Carbon Emissions of the Chinese Power Industry: Based on a Generalized Divisia Index Model and Monte Carlo Simulation," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(9), pages 1-26, September.
    6. Mathy, Sandrine & Menanteau, Philippe & Criqui, Patrick, 2018. "After the Paris Agreement: Measuring the Global Decarbonization Wedges From National Energy Scenarios," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 273-289.
    7. Alam Hossain Mondal, Md. & Mathur, Jyotirmay & Denich, Manfred, 2011. "Impacts of CO2 emission constraints on technology selection and energy resources for power generation in Bangladesh," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 2043-2050, April.
    8. Halder, P.K. & Paul, N. & Joardder, M.U.H. & Sarker, M., 2015. "Energy scarcity and potential of renewable energy in Bangladesh," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 1636-1649.
    9. Mondal, Md. Alam Hossain & Denich, Manfred, 2010. "Assessment of renewable energy resources potential for electricity generation in Bangladesh," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 14(8), pages 2401-2413, October.
    10. Xu, Bin & Lin, Boqiang, 2015. "How industrialization and urbanization process impacts on CO2 emissions in China: Evidence from nonparametric additive regression models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 188-202.
    11. Hu, Junfeng & Kahrl, Fredrich & Yan, Qingyou & Wang, Xiaoya, 2012. "The impact of China's differential electricity pricing policy on power sector CO2 emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 412-419.
    12. Zhao, Xiaoli & Ma, Qian & Yang, Rui, 2013. "Factors influencing CO2 emissions in China's power industry: Co-integration analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 89-98.
    13. Kumbaroğlu, Gürkan, 2011. "A sectoral decomposition analysis of Turkish CO2 emissions over 1990–2007," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 2419-2433.
    14. Chandran, V.G.R. & Sharma, Susan & Madhavan, Karunagaran, 2010. "Electricity consumption-growth nexus: The case of Malaysia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 606-612, January.
    15. Xu, X.Y. & Ang, B.W., 2013. "Index decomposition analysis applied to CO2 emission studies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 313-329.
    16. Ang, B.W. & Su, Bin, 2016. "Carbon emission intensity in electricity production: A global analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 56-63.
    17. Mondal, Md. Alam Hossain & Denich, Manfred & Vlek, Paul L.G., 2010. "The future choice of technologies and co-benefits of CO2 emission reduction in Bangladesh power sector," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 4902-4909.
    18. Yang Yu & Qiuyue Kong, 2017. "Analysis on the influencing factors of carbon emissions from energy consumption in China based on LMDI method," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 88(3), pages 1691-1707, September.
    19. Ma, Jia-Jun & Du, Gang & Xie, Bai-Chen, 2019. "CO2 emission changes of China's power generation system: Input-output subsystem analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 1-12.
    20. Karmellos, M. & Kopidou, D. & Diakoulaki, D., 2016. "A decomposition analysis of the driving factors of CO2 (Carbon dioxide) emissions from the power sector in the European Union countries," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 680-692.
    21. Haein Kim & Minsang Kim & Hyunggeun Kim & Sangkyu Park, 2020. "Decomposition Analysis of CO 2 Emission from Electricity Generation: Comparison of OECD Countries before and after the Financial Crisis," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(14), pages 1-16, July.
    22. Liu, Nan & Ma, Zujun & Kang, Jidong, 2017. "A regional analysis of carbon intensities of electricity generation in China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 268-277.
    23. Ang, B.W. & Goh, Tian, 2016. "Carbon intensity of electricity in ASEAN: Drivers, performance and outlook," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 170-179.
    24. Cahill, Caiman J. & Ó Gallachóir, Brian P., 2010. "Monitoring energy efficiency trends in European industry: Which top-down method should be used?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 6910-6918, November.
    25. Goh, Tian & Ang, B.W. & Xu, X.Y., 2018. "Quantifying drivers of CO2 emissions from electricity generation – Current practices and future extensions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 231(C), pages 1191-1204.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Kim, Kyunam & Kim, Yeonbae, 2012. "International comparison of industrial CO2 emission trends and the energy efficiency paradox utilizing production-based decomposition," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 1724-1741.
    2. Wang, Yanqiu & Zhu, Zhiwei & Zhu, Zhaoge & Liu, Zhenbin, 2019. "Analysis of China's energy consumption changing using the Mean Rate of Change Index and the logarithmic mean divisia index," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 275-282.
    3. de Freitas, Luciano Charlita & Kaneko, Shinji, 2011. "Decomposition of CO2 emissions change from energy consumption in Brazil: Challenges and policy implications," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1495-1504, March.
    4. Ma, Chunbo, 2014. "A multi-fuel, multi-sector and multi-region approach to index decomposition: An application to China's energy consumption 1995–2010," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 9-16.
    5. Banie Naser Outchiri, 2020. "Contributing to better energy and environmental analyses: how accurate are decomposition analysis results?," Cahiers de recherche 20-11, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    6. Lin, Boqiang & Ouyang, Xiaoling, 2014. "Analysis of energy-related CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions and reduction potential in the Chinese non-metallic mineral products industry," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 688-697.
    7. Kaltenegger, Oliver, 2019. "What drives total real unit energy costs globally? A novel LMDI decomposition approach," CAWM Discussion Papers 110, University of Münster, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM).
    8. Vaninsky, Alexander, 2014. "Factorial decomposition of CO2 emissions: A generalized Divisia index approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 389-400.
    9. Lan, Jun & Malik, Arunima & Lenzen, Manfred & McBain, Darian & Kanemoto, Keiichiro, 2016. "A structural decomposition analysis of global energy footprints," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 436-451.
    10. Kaltenegger, Oliver, 2020. "What drives total real unit energy costs globally? A novel LMDI decomposition approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 261(C).
    11. Duran, Elisa & Aravena, Claudia & Aguilar, Renato, 2015. "Analysis and decomposition of energy consumption in the Chilean industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 552-561.
    12. Fei Wang & Changjian Wang & Yongxian Su & Lixia Jin & Yang Wang & Xinlin Zhang, 2017. "Decomposition Analysis of Carbon Emission Factors from Energy Consumption in Guangdong Province from 1990 to 2014," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-15, February.
    13. Su, Bin & Ang, B.W., 2012. "Structural decomposition analysis applied to energy and emissions: Some methodological developments," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 177-188.
    14. Nagashima, Fumiya, 2018. "The sign reversal problem in structural decomposition analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 307-312.
    15. Ren, Shenggang & Fu, Xiang & Chen, XiaoHong, 2012. "Regional variation of energy-related industrial CO2 emissions mitigation in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1134-1145.
    16. Xu, X.Y. & Ang, B.W., 2013. "Index decomposition analysis applied to CO2 emission studies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 313-329.
    17. Cansino, José M. & Sánchez-Braza, Antonio & Rodríguez-Arévalo, María L., 2015. "Driving forces of Spain׳s CO2 emissions: A LMDI decomposition approach," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 749-759.
    18. Malla, Sunil, 2009. "CO2 emissions from electricity generation in seven Asia-Pacific and North American countries: A decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-9, January.
    19. González, Domingo & Martínez, Manuel, 2012. "Changes in CO2 emission intensities in the Mexican industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 149-163.
    20. Seck, Gondia Sokhna & Guerassimoff, Gilles & Maïzi, Nadia, 2016. "Analysis of the importance of structural change in non-energy intensive industry for prospective modelling: The French case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 114-124.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:6:p:2375-2384. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Haili He). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.