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The role of individual financial contributions in the formation of entrepreneurial teams

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  • Vereshchagina, Galina

Abstract

This paper studies how entrepreneurs, limited in how much they are able to contribute to a joint business, organize in partnerships, and how this process is impacted by the frictions common for team production. It demonstrates that moral hazard and reliance on simple equity sharing contracts create incentives for the entrepreneurs making large contributions to team up together, even if the production technology exhibits decreasing returns to scale to total investment. The paper formalizes this novel mechanism in a matching model and illustrates that the model’s predictions regarding co-owners’ financial contributions and ownership shares are consistent with the empirical evidence from the Kauffman Firm Survey data.

Suggested Citation

  • Vereshchagina, Galina, 2019. "The role of individual financial contributions in the formation of entrepreneurial teams," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 173-193.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:113:y:2019:i:c:p:173-193
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2019.01.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marco Cagetti & Mariacristina De Nardi, 2006. "Entrepreneurship, Frictions, and Wealth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(5), pages 835-870, October.
    2. Robert Shimer & Lones Smith, 2000. "Assortative Matching and Search," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(2), pages 343-370, March.
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    6. Jonathan Levin & Steven Tadelis, 2005. "Profit Sharing and the Role of Professional Partnerships," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(1), pages 131-171.
    7. Robert E. Carpenter & Bruce C. Petersen, 2002. "Is The Growth Of Small Firms Constrained By Internal Finance?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 298-309, May.
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    9. Sherstyuk, Katerina, 1998. "Efficiency in partnership structures," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 331-346, August.
    10. Björn Bartling & Ferdinand A. von Siemens, 2010. "Equal Sharing Rules in Partnerships," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 166(2), pages 299-320, June.
    11. Bengt Holmstrom, 1982. "Moral Hazard in Teams," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 13(2), pages 324-340, Autumn.
    12. Newman, Andrew F., 2007. "Risk-bearing and entrepreneurship," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 137(1), pages 11-26, November.
    13. Patrick Legros & Andrew F. Newman, 2007. "Beauty Is a Beast, Frog Is a Prince: Assortative Matching with Nontransferabilities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(4), pages 1073-1102, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; Team production; Assortative matching; Partnerships; Moral hazard; Equity sharing; Borrowing constraints;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

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