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Intergenerational assimilation of UK immigrants in the labour market: A minor assumption with enormous implications for inference

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  • Kone, Zovanga L.

Abstract

Studies on the intergenerational assimilation of UK immigrants and their UK-born children have mainly relied on ethnicity and birthplace to measure nativity status because of data limitations. This would inevitably lead to classification errors in the sample. We present analytical results showing biases resulting from classification errors can go in any direction even when the sole regressor is a binary variable. The empirical analysis confirms such unpredictable implications for inference. A more accurate measure of nativity status based on parent’s birthplace indicates the integration of immigrants might be different to what we would get from a measure prone to wrongly classifying individuals.

Suggested Citation

  • Kone, Zovanga L., 2018. "Intergenerational assimilation of UK immigrants in the labour market: A minor assumption with enormous implications for inference," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 94-99.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:164:y:2018:i:c:p:94-99
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2018.01.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aigner, Dennis J., 1973. "Regression with a binary independent variable subject to errors of observation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 49-59, March.
    2. Brent Kreider, 2010. "Regression Coefficient Identification Decay in The Presence of Infrequent Classification Errors," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(4), pages 1017-1023, November.
    3. Christian Dustmann & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2010. "Ethnic minority immigrants and their children in Britain," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(2), pages 209-233, April.
    4. Bound, John & Brown, Charles & Mathiowetz, Nancy, 2001. "Measurement error in survey data," Handbook of Econometrics,in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 59, pages 3705-3843 Elsevier.
    5. Brian Duncan & Jeffrey Grogger & Ana Sofia Leon & Stephen J. Trejo, 2017. "New Evidence of Generational Progress for Mexican Americans," Working Papers 2017-089, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    6. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:1:p:79-100 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Yann Algan & Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Alan Manning, 2010. "The Economic Situation of First and Second-Generation Immigrants in France, Germany and the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(542), pages 4-30, February.
    8. AIGNER, Dennis J., 1973. "Regression with a binary independent variable subject to errors of observation," CORE Discussion Papers RP 130, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    9. Klepper, Steven, 1988. "Bounding the effects of measurement error in regressions involving dichotomous variables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 343-359, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Classification errors; Immigrants; Labour market outcomes;

    JEL classification:

    • C18 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Methodolical Issues: General
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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