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Estimating interest rate elasticities in consumer credit

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  • Lukas, Moritz

Abstract

Based on a unique dataset with monthly loan account data for three types of consumer credit, I estimate the interest rate elasticity of the demand for credit across credit types. The main result shows that elasticities vary depending on the credit type used in the estimation. Moreover, borrower heterogeneity with respect to interest rate elasticities differs across credit types, too. These results have important implications for policy measures aimed at stimulating borrowing and consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Lukas, Moritz, 2017. "Estimating interest rate elasticities in consumer credit," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 155-158.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:156:y:2017:i:c:p:155-158
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2017.05.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Orazio P. Attanasio & Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Ekaterini Kyriazidou, 2008. "Credit Constraints In The Market For Consumer Durables: Evidence From Micro Data On Car Loans," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(2), pages 401-436, May.
    2. David B. Gross & Nicholas S. Souleles, 2002. "Do Liquidity Constraints and Interest Rates Matter for Consumer Behavior? Evidence from Credit Card Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 149-185.
    3. Sule Alan & Gyongyi Loranth, 2013. "Subprime Consumer Credit Demand: Evidence from a Lender's Pricing Experiment," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 26(9), pages 2353-2374.
    4. Rob Alessie & Stefan Hochguertel & Guglielmo Weber, 2005. "Consumer Credit: Evidence From Italian Micro Data," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(1), pages 144-178, March.
    5. Marianne Bertrand & Dean Karlan & Sendhil Mullainathan & Eldar Shafir & Jonathan Zinman, 2010. "What's Advertising Content Worth? Evidence from a Consumer Credit Marketing Field Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 263-306.
    6. Anthony A. DeFusco & Andrew Paciorek, 2017. "The Interest Rate Elasticity of Mortgage Demand: Evidence from Bunching at the Conforming Loan Limit," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 210-240, February.
    7. Dean S. Karlan & Jonathan Zinman, 2008. "Credit Elasticities in Less-Developed Economies: Implications for Microfinance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 1040-1068, June.
    8. Robert Phillips & A. Serdar Şimşek & Garrett van Ryzin, 2015. "The Effectiveness of Field Price Discretion: Empirical Evidence from Auto Lending," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 61(8), pages 1741-1759, August.
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