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Production management, output volatility, and good luck

  • Bivin, David G.

This paper models the scale of the technology shocks as a decision variable whose value is determined by the production manager. It is shown that smaller shocks enhance profit in several ways and thus the firm has an incentive to adopt more reliable production technologies. The adoption of these technologies may account for the "good luck" hypothesis in which the stabilization of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) since 1984 is attributed to smaller shocks. It differs from this hypothesis in two respects. First, the reduced volatility should be permanent. Second, the stabilization does not require smaller intrinsic shocks to the economy.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.

Volume (Year): 32 (2008)
Issue (Month): 7 (July)
Pages: 2118-2136

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Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:32:y:2008:i:7:p:2118-2136
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jedc

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  1. Shaghil Ahmed & Andrew Levin & Beth Anne Wilson, 2002. "Recent U.S. macroeconomic stability: good policies, good practices or good luck?," International Finance Discussion Papers 730, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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  8. Alan S. Blinder & Louis J. Maccini, 1991. "Taking Stock: A Critical Assessment of Recent Research on Inventories," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 73-96, Winter.
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  12. Michael C. Lovell, 1962. "Inventory Investment," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 131, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  13. Bivin, David G., 2008. "Production stability in a supply-chain environment," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(1), pages 265-275, July.
  14. Christiano, Lawrence J., 1988. "Why does inventory investment fluctuate so much?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 247-280.
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  16. Hirsch, Albert A., 1996. "Has inventory management in the US become more efficient and flexible? A macroeconomic perspective," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-3), pages 37-46, August.
  17. James A. Kahn & Margaret M. McConnell & Gabriel Perez-Quiros, 2002. "On the causes of the increased stability of the U.S. economy," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue May, pages 183-202.
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