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Personal control and service connection as paths to improved mental health and exiting homelessness among severely marginalized homeless youth

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  • Slesnick, Natasha
  • Zhang, Jing
  • Brakenhoff, Brittany

Abstract

Non-service connected, continuously homeless youth are arguably one of the most vulnerable populations in the U.S. These youth reside at society's margins experiencing an accumulation of risks over time. Research concludes that as vulnerabilities increase so do poor long-term outcomes. This study tested the mediating effects of service connection and personal control as mediators of cumulative risk and housing, health and mental health outcomes. By understanding the processes associated with therapeutic change among those with the most vulnerabilities, service providers and researchers can target those factors to enhance positive outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Slesnick, Natasha & Zhang, Jing & Brakenhoff, Brittany, 2017. "Personal control and service connection as paths to improved mental health and exiting homelessness among severely marginalized homeless youth," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 121-127.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:73:y:2017:i:c:p:121-127
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.11.033
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tsemberis, S. & Gulcur, L. & Nakae, M., 2004. "Housing First, Consumer Choice, and Harm Reduction for Homeless Individuals with a Dual Diagnosis," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 94(4), pages 651-656.
    2. Ensign, Jo & Gittelsohn, Joel, 1998. "Health and access to care: Perspectives of homeless youth in Baltimore City, U.S.A," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 47(12), pages 2087-2099, December.
    3. Yang, Chih-Chien, 2006. "Evaluating latent class analysis models in qualitative phenotype identification," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 1090-1104, February.
    4. Slesnick, Natasha & Dashora, Pushpanjali & Letcher, Amber & Erdem, Gizem & Serovich, Julianne, 2009. "A review of services and interventions for runaway and homeless youth: Moving forward," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 732-742, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Gaetz, 2020. "Making the Prevention of Homelessness a Priority: The Role of Social Innovation," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 79(2), pages 353-381, March.
    2. Parry, Benjamin J. & Quinton, Mary L. & Holland, Mark J.G. & Thompson, Janice L. & Cumming, Jennifer, 2021. "Improving outcomes in young people experiencing homelessness with My Strengths Training for Life™ (MST4Life™): A qualitative realist evaluation," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 121(C).
    3. Morton, Matthew H. & Kugley, Shannon & Epstein, Richard & Farrell, Anne, 2020. "Interventions for youth homelessness: A systematic review of effectiveness studies," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 116(C).

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