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Evidence of panel stationarity from Chinese provincial and regional income

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  • Narayan, Paresh Kumar

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to examine whether Chinese provincial and regional real GDP and per capita real GDP are panel stationary for the period 1952-2003. We allow for multiple structural breaks based on a technique developed by Carrion-i-Silvestre et al. [Carrion-i-Silvestre, J. L., Barrio-Castro, T, D., & Lopez-Bazo, E. (2005). Breaking the panels: An application to the GDP per capita. Econometrics Journal, 8, 159-175]. Allowing for at most five structural breaks, we find that for 67% of the provinces, per capita real GDP is stationary; while we only find stationarity of real GDP for 17% of the provinces. However, when we extend the analysis to panel data models, we find statistically strong evidence of panel stationarity of Chinese provincial and regional income.

Suggested Citation

  • Narayan, Paresh Kumar, 2008. "Evidence of panel stationarity from Chinese provincial and regional income," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 274-286, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:19:y:2008:i:2:p:274-286
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    Cited by:

    1. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Lee, Jun-De, 2009. "Income and CO2 emissions: Evidence from panel unit root and cointegration tests," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 413-423, February.
    2. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell, 2007. "A panel cointegration analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 6258-6265, December.
    3. Xuan-Binh Vu & Son Nghiem, 2016. "Analysis of GDP trends and inequalities in Vietnam`s provinces and groups of provinces," Asian Journal of Empirical Research, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(7), pages 167-186, July.
    4. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chang, Chun-Ping, 2009. "Stochastic convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions and multiple structural breaks in OECD countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1375-1381, November.
    5. PareshKumar Narayan & Seema Narayan, 2008. "Do Permanent Shocks Explain Income Levels? A Common Cycle-Common Trend Analysis Of Regional Income Levels For China," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(5), pages 656-662, December.
    6. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Popp, Stephan, 2009. "Investigating business cycle asymmetry for the G7 countries: Evidence from over a century of data," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 583-591, October.

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