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A Contribution of Expected Utility Theory in Taxpayers’ Behavior Modeling

Author

Listed:
  • Farid Ameur

    (Studies and Research Laboratory in Applied Mathematics (LERMA), Mohammadia School of Engineering, Mohamed V University, Rabat BP. 765, Morocco,)

  • Mohamed Tkiouat

    (Studies and Research Laboratory in Applied Mathematics (LERMA), Mohammadia School of Engineering, Mohamed V University, Rabat BP. 765, Morocco.)

Abstract

We try to analyze the attitudes of taxpayers regarding tax system. We propose an approach which combines between theory and practice. In the first step, we present a normative approach; based on a theoretical study. In order to produce an empirical knowledge of an aspect of reality we present a descriptive approach; based on a survey of different categories of taxpayers. We have released some conditions of the model of expected utility and we have introduced a new parameter reflecting the efficiency of tax control. Previous studies are based on a maximal efficiency tax control (100%) which is a particular case of our model. We found that for Moroccan case, the fraud is related to the size of companies; it’s more important in the big companies than small and medium enterprises. The findings will help tax authorities to achieve their goals in fighting tax fraud.

Suggested Citation

  • Farid Ameur & Mohamed Tkiouat, 2016. "A Contribution of Expected Utility Theory in Taxpayers’ Behavior Modeling," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 1217-1224.
  • Handle: RePEc:eco:journ1:2016-03-52
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    2. Allingham, Michael G. & Sandmo, Agnar, 1972. "Income tax evasion: a theoretical analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3-4), pages 323-338, November.
    3. Andrew Caplin & John Leahy, 2001. "Psychological Expected Utility Theory and Anticipatory Feelings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 55-79.
    4. Koskela, Erkki, 1983. "On the Shape of Tax Schedule, the Probability of Detection, and the Penalty Schemes as Deterrents to Tax Evasion," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 38(1), pages 70-80.
    5. Nigar Hashimzade & Gareth D. Myles & Binh Tran-Nam, 2013. "Applications Of Behavioural Economics To Tax Evasion," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(5), pages 941-977, December.
    6. Dhami, Sanjit & al-Nowaihi, Ali, 2007. "Why do people pay taxes? Prospect theory versus expected utility theory," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 171-192, September.
    7. Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 1974. "Income tax evasion: A theoretical analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 201-202, May.
    8. Feige, Edgar L. & Cebula, Richard, 2011. "America’s Underground Economy: Measuring the Size, Growth and Determinants of Income Tax Evasion in the U.S," MPRA Paper 29672, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Expected Utility; Prospect Theory; Survey; Underground Economy; Tax Fraud; Tax Authority; Tax Audit; Tax Compliance; Taxpayers; Behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents
    • C5 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling

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