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Rational Adversaries? Evidence from Randomised Trials in One Day Cricket

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  • V. Bhaskar

Abstract

In cricket, the right to make an important strategic decision (bat first or field first) is assigned via a coin toss. I use these 'randomised trials' to examine the consistency of choices made by teams with strictly opposed preferences and the effects of these choices upon the outcomes in the game. I find significant evidence of inconsistency, with teams often agreeing on who is to bat first. Estimated treatment effects show that choices are often poorly made and "reduce" the probability of the team winning, a particularly surprising finding given the intensely competitive environment and opportunities for learning. Copyright © The Author(s). Journal compilation © Royal Economic Society 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • V. Bhaskar, 2009. "Rational Adversaries? Evidence from Randomised Trials in One Day Cricket," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(534), pages 1-23, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:119:y:2009:i:534:p:1-23
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    Cited by:

    1. Jose Apesteguia & Ignacio Palacios-Huerta, 2010. "Psychological Pressure in Competitive Environments: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2548-2564, December.
    2. McGinn Eamon, 2013. "The effect of batting during the evening in cricket," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 9(2), pages 141-150, June.
    3. González-Díaz, Julio & Palacios-Huerta, Ignacio, 2016. "Cognitive performance in competitive environments: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 40-52.
    4. Sebastian Bervoets & Bruno Decreuse & Mathieu Faure, 2014. "A Renewed Analysis of Cheating in Contests: Theory and Evidence from Recovery Doping," AMSE Working Papers 1441, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised Jun 2015.
    5. Sarah Jewell & James Reade, 2014. "On Fixing International Cricket Matches," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2014-08, Henley Business School, Reading University.

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