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An experimental analysis of the existing differences of productivity across genders


  • Ahmed Ennasri

    () (LAMETA)


This paper contributes to the empirical literature on the connection between productivity and gender by using experimental methods in order to produce the relevant data that is missing. This experiment is based on a principal agent game in which principals offer payments and agents choose a costly level of effort, unobservable to the principal. The experimental findings confirm that, an uncertain outcome activity, females are less productive than males.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahmed Ennasri, 2011. "An experimental analysis of the existing differences of productivity across genders," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(4), pages 3304-3310.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00664

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Catherine C. Eckel & Philip J. Grossman, 2002. "Sex Differences and Statistical Stereotyping in Attitudes Toward Financial Risk," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-03, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. Ahmed Ennasri & Marc Willinger, 2011. "Managerial incentives under competitive pressure: Experimental investigation," Working Papers 11-12, LAMETA, Universtiy of Montpellier, revised Jun 2011.
    3. Catherine L McDevitt & James R Irwin & Kris Inwood, 2009. "Gender Pay Gap, Productivity Gap and Discrimination in Canadian Clothing Manufacturing in 1870," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 24-36.
    4. Torbjørn Hægeland & Tor Jakob Klette, 1997. "Do Higher Wages Reflect Higher Productivity? Education, Gender and Experience Premiums in a Matched Plant-Worker Data Set," Discussion Papers 208, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. Catherine C. Eckel & Philip J. Grossman, 2008. "Forecasting Risk Attitudes: An Experimental Study Using Actual and Forecast Gamble Choices," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-01, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    6. Pekka Ilmakunnas & Mika Maliranta, 2002. "Labour characteristics and wage-productivity gaps," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 73-74.
    7. Bruno Crépon & Nicolas Deniau & Sébastien Pérez-Duarte, 2003. "Wages, Productivity and Worker Characteristics : A French Perspective," Working Papers 2003-04, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
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    More about this item


    Experiment; Gender; Productivity; Principal-agent game;

    JEL classification:

    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs


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