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Structural changes in exchange rate regimes in Brazil


  • Reginaldo Pinto Nogueira

    () (IBMEC-MG)

  • Claudio Djissey Shikida

    () (IBMEC-MG)

  • Ari Francisco de Araujo

    () (IBMEC-MG)


Following a dramatic breakdown of a managed floating regime, Brazil adopted a framework for policy consisting of inflation targeting and floating exchange rates. The country's commitment to this arrangement, however, is often put to dispute. In this paper we revisit the issue of whether Brazil has truly accepted to let its currency float, taking use of cross-currency linear regression models complemented by inferential techniques for evaluating the stability of exchange rate regimes. The results found suggest that Brazil does seem to have shifted towards greater exchange rate flexibility after the abandonment of its dollar-peg. However, after the adoption of inflation targeting the degree of exchange rate flexibility seems to have reduced a little.

Suggested Citation

  • Reginaldo Pinto Nogueira & Claudio Djissey Shikida & Ari Francisco de Araujo, 2011. "Structural changes in exchange rate regimes in Brazil," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(2), pages 1748-1756.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00296

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408.
    2. Zeileis, Achim, 2006. "Implementing a class of structural change tests: An econometric computing approach," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(11), pages 2987-3008, July.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2004. "The Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinterpretation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 1-48.
    4. Zeileis, Achim & Shah, Ajay & Patnaik, Ila, 2010. "Testing, monitoring, and dating structural changes in exchange rate regimes," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 1696-1706, June.
    5. Ball, Christopher P. & Reyes, Javier, 2008. "Inflation targeting or fear of floating in disguise? A broader perspective," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 308-326, March.
    6. Nogueira Jr., Reginaldo P. & León-Ledesma, Miguel A., 2009. "Fear of Floating in Brazil: Did Inflation Targeting matter?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 255-266, December.
    7. Jushan Bai & Pierre Perron, 2003. "Computation and analysis of multiple structural change models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 1-22.
    8. repec:hrv:faseco:34721963 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item


    Structural changes; exchange rate regimes; emerging markets.;

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General


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