IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The relationship between changes in the Economic Sentiment Indicator and real GDP growth: a time-varying coefficient approach

  • Luca Zanin

    ()

    (Prometeia)

The aim of this paper is to capture the time-varying effects of the relationship between changes in the Economic Sentiment Indicator (ESI) and economic growth. We use penalized regression splines to estimate the different point effects over time. Evidence from six European countries supports the idea that the elasticity of the ESI is time-varying.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2010/Volume30/EB-10-V30-I1-P78.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 30 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 837-846

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00634
Contact details of provider:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Qiao, Zhuo & McAleer, Michael & Wong, Wing-Keung, 2009. "Linear and nonlinear causality between changes in consumption and consumer attitudes," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 161-164, March.
  2. Simon N. Wood, 2003. "Thin plate regression splines," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 65(1), pages 95-114.
  3. Victor Ginsburgh & ISRAEL Zang, 2007. "Bundling by competitors and the sharing of profits," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/7280, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  4. John A. Cotsomitis & Andy C. C. Kwan, 2004. "Can Consumer Confidence Forecast Household Spending? Evidence from the European Commission Business and Consumer Surveys," Departmental Working Papers _161, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
  5. Carroll, Christopher D & Fuhrer, Jeffrey C & Wilcox, David W, 1994. "Does Consumer Sentiment Forecast Household Spending? If So, Why?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1397-1408, December.
  6. Sarah Gelper & Christophe Croux, 2010. "On the Construction of the European Economic Sentiment Indicator," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 47-62, 02.
  7. Sydney C. Ludvigson, 2004. "Consumer Confidence and Consumer Spending," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(2), pages 29-50, Spring.
  8. John Maindonald, . "Generalized Additive Models: An Introduction with R," Journal of Statistical Software, American Statistical Association, vol. 16(b03).
  9. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:12:y:2007:i:16:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Jason Bram & Sydney Ludvigson, 1998. "Does consumer confidence forecast household expenditure? a sentiment index horse race," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jun, pages 59-78.
  11. Frank Westerhoff, 2008. "Consumer sentiment and business cycles: a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation scenario," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(15), pages 1201-1205.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00634. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.