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The Impact of Economic Globalization on Income Distribution: Empirical Evidence in China

Author

Listed:
  • Baotai Wang

    () (University of Northern BC)

  • Ajit Dayanandan

    () (University of Northern BC)

  • Xiaofei Tian

    () (Hebei University)

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of economic globalization, as characterized by increasing international trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) flows, on income distribution in China. The Gini coefficients - the conventional measure of income inequality - are used in this study and the empirical investigation is conducted within the unit root and cointegration framework. The empirical results show that economic globalization tends to improve income inequality in China. Therefore, the worsening of income inequality in China must be caused by other factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Baotai Wang & Ajit Dayanandan & Xiaofei Tian, 2008. "The Impact of Economic Globalization on Income Distribution: Empirical Evidence in China," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 4(35), pages 1-8.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-08d30006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jai Mah, 2002. "The impact of globalization on income distribution: the Korean experience," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(15), pages 1007-1009.
    2. Feenstra, Robert C. & Hanson, Gordon H., 1997. "Foreign direct investment and relative wages: Evidence from Mexico's maquiladoras," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-4), pages 371-393, May.
    3. Spilimbergo, Antonio & Londono, Juan Luis & Szekely, Miguel, 1999. "Income distribution, factor endowments, and trade openness," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 77-101, June.
    4. Beyer, Harald & Rojas, Patricio & Vergara, Rodrigo, 1999. "Trade liberalization and wage inequality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 103-123, June.
    5. Harrison, Ann & Hanson, Gordon, 1999. "Who gains from trade reform? Some remaining puzzles," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 125-154, June.
    6. Baotai Wang & D Ajit, 2006. "The Impact Of Globalization On Income Inequality: Empirical Evidence From Canada And India," The IUP Journal of Applied Economics, IUP Publications, vol. 0(6), pages 7-16, November.
    7. Gregory, Allan W. & Hansen, Bruce E., 1996. "Residual-based tests for cointegration in models with regime shifts," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 99-126, January.
    8. Gregory, Allan W. & Hansen, Bruce E., 1996. "Residual-based tests for cointegration in models with regime shifts," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 99-126, January.
    9. Barro, Robert J, 2000. "Inequality and Growth in a Panel of Countries," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 5-32, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bukhari, Mahnoor & Munir, Kashif, 2016. "Impact of Globalization on Income Inequality in Selected Asian Countries," MPRA Paper 74248, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalization;

    JEL classification:

    • D3 - Microeconomics - - Distribution
    • C2 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables

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