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Bank runs, political distortions and contagion

Author

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  • Victor Vaugirard

    () (TEAM-CNRS University of Paris at Sorbonne)

Abstract

This paper highlights the spread of banking panics across countries, as the public reassesses governments' propensity to bailouts. Policymakers decide whether to rescue a failing banking sector, by weighing the costs of a collapse against the costs associated with raising taxes to finance a bailout package. The former involve social costs for the society and personal costs for policymakers. In addition, they have an informational advantage over creditors regarding the costs of bank liquidation. A crisis in a country leads lenders to reexamine policymakers'' willingness to intervene in other countries, which eventually makes their banks more vulnerable to self-fulfilling depositors'' runs.

Suggested Citation

  • Victor Vaugirard, 2004. "Bank runs, political distortions and contagion," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 6(18), pages 1-10.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04f30009
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert Dekle & Kenneth Kletzer, 2002. "Domestic Bank Regulation and Financial Crises: Theory and Empirical Evidence from East Asia," NBER Chapters,in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 507-558 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kumar, Manmohan S & Persaud, Avinash, 2002. "Pure Contagion and Investors' Shifting Risk Appetite: Analytical Issues and Empirical Evidence," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(3), pages 401-436, Winter.
    3. Masson, Paul, 1999. "Contagion:: macroeconomic models with multiple equilibria," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 587-602, August.
    4. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    5. Diaz-Alejandro, Carlos, 1985. "Good-bye financial repression, hello financial crash," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 1-24.
    6. Victor E. Vaugirard, 2004. "Informational Contagion of Sudden Stops in a Global Games Framework," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 169-192, April.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services

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