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Fertility and Public Policies - Evidence from Norway and Finland

  • Marit Rønsen

    (Statistics Norway)

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    The relatively high and rising fertility rates of Nordic countries in the late 1980s and early 1990s sparked a renewed research interest in the possible pronatalistic effects of generous family policy programs. Several studies have addressed this issue, but few have tried to model policy effects explicitly. The existing evidence so far is mainly from Sweden, where policy indicators have been incorporated in economic fertility models that also control for female wages. This paper complements previous Swedish analyses with evidence from Norway and Finland. The results corroborate earlier findings of a negative effect of female wages. There are also indications of a positive policy impact, as maternity leave extensions are estimated to raise birth rates, although mainly higher parity births and mainly in Finland.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol10/6/10-6.pdf
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    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 6 (May)
    Pages: 143-170

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:10:y:2004:i:6
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    1. Øystein Kravdal, 2001. "The High Fertility of College Educated Women in Norway," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 5(6), pages 187-216, December.
    2. Marit RÃnsen & Marianne SundstrÃm, 1996. "Maternal employment in Scandinavia: A comparison of the after-birth employment activity of Norwegian and Swedish women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 267-285.
    3. James R. Walker, 2002. "A Comment on Ali Tasiran's `Wage and income effects on the timing and spacing of births in Sweden and in the United States'," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 773-782.
    4. Ronsen, Marit & Sundstrom, Marianne, 1996. "Maternal Employment in Scandinavia: A Comparison of the After-Birth Employment Activity of Norwegian and Swedish Women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 267-85, August.
    5. Heckman, J.J. & Walker, J.R., 1989. "The Third Birth In Sweden," Papers 573, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
    6. Cristino R. Arroyo & Junsen Zhang, 1997. "Dynamic microeconomic models of fertility choice: A survey," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 23-65.
    7. James R. Walker, 1994. "The Effect of Public Policies on Recent Swedish Fertility Behavior," Labor and Demography 9410001, EconWPA.
    8. Barmby, T & Cigno, A, 1990. "A Sequential Probability Model of Fertility Patterns," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 31-51, April.
    9. Groot, Wim & Pott-Buter, Hettie A, 1992. "The Timing of Maternity in the Netherlands," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 155-72, April.
    10. Ali C. Tasiran, 2002. "A reply to Walker's note: A comment on Tasiran's `Wage and income effects on the timing and spacing of births in Sweden and in the United States'," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 783-796.
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