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A Note On Inflation Persistence In A Fair Wage Model Of The Business Cycle

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  • de la Croix, David
  • de Walque, Gregory
  • Wouters, Rafael

Abstract

We first build a fair wage model in which effort varies over the business cycle. This mechanism decreases the need for other sources of sluggishness to explain the observed high inflation persistence. Second, we confront empirically our fair wage model with a New Keynesian model based on the standard assumption of monopolistic competition in the labor market. We show that, in terms of overall fit, the fair wage model outperforms the New Keynesian one. The extension of the fair wage model with lagged wage is judged insignificant by the data, but the extension based on a rent sharing argument including firm’s productivity gains in the fair wage is not. Looking at the implications for monetary policy, we conclude that the additional trade-off problem created by the inefficient real wage behavior significantly affects nominal interest rates and inflation outcomes
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Suggested Citation

  • de la Croix, David & de Walque, Gregory & Wouters, Rafael, 2009. "A Note On Inflation Persistence In A Fair Wage Model Of The Business Cycle," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(05), pages 673-684, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:13:y:2009:i:05:p:673-684_08
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jean-Pierre Danthine & Andre Kurmann, 2004. "Fair Wages in a New Keynesian Model of the Business Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 7(1), pages 107-142, January.
    2. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Robert Vigfusson, 2003. "What Happens After a Technology Shock?," NBER Working Papers 9819, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Solow, Robert M., 1979. "Another possible source of wage stickiness," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 79-82.
    4. Frank Smets & Raf Wouters, 2003. "An Estimated Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model of the Euro Area," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(5), pages 1123-1175, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Danthine, Jean-Pierre & Kurmann, André, 2010. "The business cycle implications of reciprocity in labor relations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(7), pages 837-850, October.
    2. Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2010. "Monetary persistence and the labor market: A new perspective," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 968-983, May.
    3. Raurich, Xavier & Sorolla, Valeri, 2014. "Growth, unemployment and wage inertia," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 42-59.
    4. Dennis Wesselbaum, 2013. "Reciprocity and matching frictions," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 60(3), pages 247-268, September.
    5. Sean Langcake, 2010. "Inflation Persistence and Labour Market Frictions: An Estimated Efficiency Wage Model of the Australian Economy," School of Economics Working Papers 2010-15, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    6. Gerhard Rünstler, "undated". "Shirking, Endogenous Lay-off Rates and the A-cyclicality of the Real Wage," WIFO Working Papers 350, WIFO.
    7. Geert Langenus, 2006. "Fiscal sustainability indicators and policy design in the face of ageing," Working Paper Research 102, National Bank of Belgium.
    8. Yakita, Akira, 2014. "Involuntary unemployment and sustainability of bond-financed fiscal deficit," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 79-93.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit

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