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Crafting analytical tools to study institutional change

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  • OSTROM, ELINOR
  • BASURTO, XAVIER

Abstract

Most powerful analytical tools used in the social sciences are well suited for studying static situations. Static and mechanistic analysis, however, is not adequate to understand the changing world in which we live. In order to adequately address the most pressing social and environmental challenges looming ahead, we need to develop analytical tools for analyzing dynamic situations – particularly institutional change. In this paper, we develop an analytical tool to study institutional change, more specifically, the evolution of rules and norms. We believe that in order for such an analytical tool to be useful to develop a general theory of institutional change, it needs to enable the analyst to concisely record the processes of change in multiple specific settings so that lessons from such settings can eventually be integrated into a more general predictive theory of change.

Suggested Citation

  • Ostrom, Elinor & Basurto, Xavier, 2011. "Crafting analytical tools to study institutional change," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(03), pages 317-343, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jinsec:v:7:y:2011:i:03:p:317-343_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Devotha B. Mosha & George C. Kajembe & Andrew K. P. R. Tarimo & Paul Vedeld & Gimbaje, E. Mbeyale, 2016. "Performance of Water Management Institutions in Farmer-Managed Irrigation Schemes in Iringa Rural and Kilombero Districts, Tanzania," International Journal of Asian Social Science, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(8), pages 430-445, August.
    2. Weinstein, Olivier, 2013. "Comment comprendre les « communs » : Elinor Ostrom, la propriété et la nouvelle économie institutionnelle," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 14.
    3. Ermanno Tortia & Martha Knox Haly & Anthony Jensen, 2014. "Workers' propensity to cooperate with colleagues and the general population: a comparison based on a field experiment," Econometica Working Papers wp52, Econometica.
    4. Tortia, Ermanno C., 2017. "The firm as a common. The case of the accumulation and use of capital resources in co-operative enterprises," MPRA Paper 76735, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Michael Howlett & Ishani Mukherjee & Jeremy Rayner, 2014. "The Elements of Effective Program Design: A Two-Level Analysis," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 2(2), pages 1-12.
    6. Tortia, Ermanno & Knox Haly, Martha & Jensen, Anthony, 2013. "From the Neoliberal to the Participatory Firm," AICCON Working Papers 130-2013, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
    7. Holden, Stein T. & Tilahun, Mesfin, 2018. "The importance of Ostrom’s Design Principles: Youth group performance in northern Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 10-30.
    8. Grouiez, Pascal, 2013. "Understanding the puzzling resilience of the land share ownership in Russia: the input of Ostrom’s approach," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 14.
    9. Tortia, Ermanno, 2014. "L'impresa come bene comune," AICCON Working Papers 131-2013, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
    10. G. Blind & A. Pyka, 2014. "The rule approach in evolutionary economics: A methodological template for empirical research," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(5), pages 1085-1105, November.
    11. Blind, Georg, 2015. "Behavioural rules: Veblen, Nelson-Winter, Oström and beyond," MPRA Paper 66866, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Herzfeld, Thomas & Jongeneel, Roel, 2012. "Why do farmers behave as they do? Understanding compliance with rural, agricultural, and food attribute standards," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 250-260.
    13. repec:spr:humman:v:2:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s41463-017-0024-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Kurt Dopfer, 2013. "Evolutionary Economics," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-08, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    15. Allaire, Gilles, 2013. "Les communs comme infrastructure institutionnelle de l’économie marchande," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 14.
    16. Blind, Georg, 2011. "Investigating entrepreneurial spirit with the rule approach: why self-employment is on the decline in Japan," MPRA Paper 66749, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Kurt Dopfer, 2013. "Economics with a Phylogenetic Signature," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-06, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    18. Franklin Obeng-Odoom, 2016. "The Meaning, Prospects, and Future of the Commons: Revisiting the Legacies of Elinor Ostrom and Henry George," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 75(2), pages 372-414, March.
    19. Havas, Attila, 2016. "Recent economic theorising on innovation: Lessons for analysing social innovation," MPRA Paper 77385, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Jun, Bogang & Kim, Tai-Yoo, 2015. "A neo-Schumpeterian perspective on the analytical macroeconomic framework: The expanded reproduction system," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 11-2015, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    21. Kurt Dopfer, 2011. "Economics in a Cultural Key: Complexity and Evolution Revisited," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology, chapter 14 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    22. Catherine Murray & Garry McDonald & Shane Cronin, 2015. "Interpreting Auckland’s volcanic governance through an institutional lens," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 75(1), pages 441-464, January.

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