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A Neowicksellian in a New Classical World: The Methodology of Michael Woodford's Interest and Prices

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  • Hoover, Kevin D.

Abstract

Woodford?s Interest and Prices is considered from a methodological point of view. While innovative as a work of macroeconomic theory, it is decidedly in the mainstream methodologically. As such, it provides a good example of the methodological puzzles posed by modern macroeconomics: first, the notion that representative-agent models (or models with very constrained sorts of heterogeneous agents) provide genuine microfoundations; second, the idea that Paretian welfare economics in the context of such models gives any useful policy guidance.
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Suggested Citation

  • Hoover, Kevin D., 2006. "A Neowicksellian in a New Classical World: The Methodology of Michael Woodford's Interest and Prices," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 28(02), pages 143-149, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jhisec:v:28:y:2006:i:02:p:143-149_00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Neil R. Ericsson & John S. Irons, 1995. "The Lucas critique in practice: theory without measurement," International Finance Discussion Papers 506, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Mantel, Rolf R., 1974. "On the characterization of aggregate excess demand," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 348-353, March.
    3. Jeff Fuhrer & Arturo Estrella, 1999. "Are 'Deep' Parameters Stable? The Lucas Critique as an Empirical Hypothesis," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 621, Society for Computational Economics.
    4. C.A. Favero & D.F. Hendry, 1989. "Testing the Lucas Critique: A Review," Working Papers 212, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    5. Debreu, Gerard, 1974. "Excess demand functions," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 15-21, March.
    6. Jesus Felipe & Franklin M. Fisher, 2003. "Aggregation in Production Functions: What Applied Economists should Know," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2-3), pages 208-262, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fabio Bacchini & Cristina Brandimarte & Piero Crivelli & Roberta De Santis & Marco Fioramanti & Alessandro Girardi & Roberto Golinelli & Cecilia Jona-Lasinio & Massimo Mancini & Carmine Pappalardo & D, 2013. "Building the core of the Istat system of models for forecasting the Italian economy: MeMo-It," Rivista di statistica ufficiale, ISTAT - Italian National Institute of Statistics - (Rome, ITALY), vol. 15(1), pages 17-45.
    2. Pedro Garcia Duarte, 2011. "Recent Developments in Macroeconomics: The DSGE Approach to Business Cycles in Perspective," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Thiago Dumont Oliveira & Carlos Eduardo Suprinyak, 2016. "Lionel Robbins’ first-step individualism and the prehistory of microfoundations," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG 537, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
    4. Koen Vermeylen, 2013. "The Methodology of Modern Macroeconomics and the Descriptive Approach to Discounting," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-200/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Alexander Tobon & Nicolas Barbaroux, 2015. "Credit and Prices in Woodford's New Neoclassical Synthesis," Economic Thought, World Economics Association, vol. 4(1), pages 21-46, March.
    6. Anari, Ali & Kolari, James, 2016. "Dynamics of interest and inflation rates," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(PA), pages 129-144.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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