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Employment Flows and Job Tenure in Canada

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  • Louis N. Christofides
  • C. J. McKenna

Abstract

Data from Canada's 1986-87 Labour Market Activity Survey (LMAS) are used to study the pattern of employment flows, and to construct various estimates of average job duration. A subsample of 58,458 observed jobs are classified according to their start dates and their termination date, if any. Thus our sample consists of both completed and censored employment spells. In the case of terminations, data are available on the reason for employment ending. The distribution of completed spell lengths, which indicates the steady-state flow of new jobs, is highly skewed, with a mode around 10 weeks. Using the Akerlof and Main (1981) termination-weighted measure of job expectancy in the stock of jobs we find this to be around eight years. Our findings on job durations are comparable with those for the United States and Great Britain. In addition, average durations vary systematically with age, sex, industry, occupation, education, province, firm-size and unionization.

Suggested Citation

  • Louis N. Christofides & C. J. McKenna, 1993. "Employment Flows and Job Tenure in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 19(2), pages 145-161, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:19:y:1993:i:2:p:145-161
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ham, John C & Rea, Samuel A, Jr, 1987. "Unemployment Insurance and Male Unemployment Duration in Canada," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(3), pages 325-353, July.
    2. Hashimoto, Masanori & Raisian, John, 1985. "Employment Tenure and Earnings Profiles in Japan and the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 721-735, September.
    3. Charles M. Beach & S. F. Kaliski, 1983. "Measuring the Duration of Unemployment from Gross Flow Data," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 16(2), pages 258-263, May.
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    5. Stephen R G Jones, 1992. "The Cyclical and Seasonal Behaviour of Canadian Gross Flows of Labour," Department of Economics Working Papers 1992-01, McMaster University.
    6. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    7. Light, Audrey & Ureta, Manuelita, 1992. "Panel Estimates of Male and Female Job Turnover Behavior: Can Female Nonquitters Be Identified?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(2), pages 156-181, April.
    8. Stephen W. Salant, 1977. "Search Theory and Duration Data: A Theory of Sorts," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 91(1), pages 39-57.
    9. Main, Brian G M, 1982. "The Length of a Job in Great Britain," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 49(195), pages 325-333, August.
    10. George L. Perry, 1972. "Unemployment Flows in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 3(2), pages 245-292.
    11. Stephen R. G. Jones, 1993. "Cyclical and Seasonal Properties of Canadian Gross Flows of Labour," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 19(1), pages 1-17, March.
    12. Jonathan S. Leonard, 1986. "In the Wrong Place at the Wrong Time: The Extent of Frictional and Structural Unemployment," NBER Working Papers 1979, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andolfatto, David & Gomme, Paul, 1996. "Unemployment insurance and labor-market activity in Canada," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 47-82, June.
    2. Andreas Hornstein & Mingwei Yuan, 1999. "Can a Matching Model Explain the Long-Run Increase in Canada's Unemployment Rate?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(4), pages 878-905, August.
    3. Kapsalis, Constantine, 2000. "The Impact of Bill C-12 on New Entrants and Re-Entrants," MPRA Paper 26137, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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