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Finite Memory Distributed Systems


  • Dorofeenko Victor

    () (Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna)

  • Shorish Jamsheed

    () (Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna)


A distributed system model is studied, where individual agents play repeatedly against each other and change their strategies based upon previous play. It is shown how to model this environment in terms of continuous population densities of agent types. A complication arises because the population densities of different strategies depend upon each other not only through game payoffs, but also through the strategy distributions themselves. In spite of this, it is shown that when an agent imitates the strategy of his previous opponent at a sufficiently high rate, the system of equations which governs the dynamical evolution of agent populations can be reduced to one equation for the total population. In a sense, the dynamics 'collapse' to the dynamics of the entire system taken as a whole, which describes the behavior of all types of agents. We explore the implications of this model, and present both analytical and simulation results.

Suggested Citation

  • Dorofeenko Victor & Shorish Jamsheed, 2006. "Finite Memory Distributed Systems," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-27, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejtec:v:contributions.6:y:2006:i:1:n:14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dorofeenko, Victor & Shorish, Jamsheed, 2005. "Partial differential equation modelling for stochastic fixed strategy distributed systems," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(1-2), pages 335-367, January.
    2. Joshua M. Epstein & Robert L. Axtell, 1996. "Growing Artificial Societies: Social Science from the Bottom Up," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262550253, July.
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    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games


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