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Decomposing The Technology Shift: Evidence From The Swedish Manufacturing Sector

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  • KARL-JOHAN LUNDQUIST
  • LARS-OLOF OLANDER
  • MARTIN SVENSSON HENNING

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to conduct an analysis of the changing geographies of production and industrial renewal in Sweden during the period 1978 to 2004. Conceptually, we build on the regional version of the technology shift cycle thesis. This is performed in two steps and by combinations of national and regional empirical evidence. First, we construct a taxonomic method that distinguishes between renewed, followers, transformed, induced, contracting, and obsolete industries in the national production system. These different kinds of industries have all had different roles in the dramatic transformation of Swedish manufacturing, and we empirically identify the groups of industries using new time series data. Second, the regional footprints of the transformation are investigated applying a systemic view of regional development. The results of our investigations provide a detailed picture of the anatomies of both sector and regional transformation of the Swedish economy. Copyright (c) 2008 by the Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG.

Suggested Citation

  • Karl-Johan Lundquist & Lars-Olof Olander & Martin Svensson Henning, 2008. "Decomposing The Technology Shift: Evidence From The Swedish Manufacturing Sector," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 99(2), pages 145-159, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:tvecsg:v:99:y:2008:i:2:p:145-159
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    Cited by:

    1. Ejermo, Olof & Kander, Astrid & Svensson Henning, Martin, 2011. "The R&D-growth paradox arises in fast-growing sectors," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 664-672.
    2. Karl-Johan Lundquist & Lars-Olof Olander, 2011. "Growth Cycles -Transformation and regional development," ERSA conference papers ersa10p918, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Lundquist, Karl-Johan & Olander, Lars-Olof, 2010. "Growth cycles: transformation and regional development," SRE-Discussion Papers 2961, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    4. Lengauer, Lukas & Nussmüller, Eva & Trippl, Michaela & Tödtling, Franz, 2008. "Innovation and knowledge sourcing in the Vienna ICT manufacturing sector," SRE-Discussion Papers 146, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    5. Shanaka Herath, 2009. "The Size of the Government and Economic Growth: An Empirical Study of Sri Lanka," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2009_08, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.

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