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Is Immigration Responsible for the Crime Drop? An Assessment of the Influence of Immigration on Changes in Violent Crime Between 1990 and 2000

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  • Tim Wadsworth

Abstract

The idea that immigration increases crime rates has historically occupied an important role in criminological theory and has been central to the public and political discourses and debates on immigration policy. In contrast to the common sentiment, some scholars have recently questioned whether the increase in immigration between 1990 and 2000 may have actually been responsible for part of the national decrease in crime during the 1990s. The current work evaluates the influence of immigration on crime in urban areas across the United States between 1990 and 2000. Copyright (c) 2010 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Wadsworth, 2010. "Is Immigration Responsible for the Crime Drop? An Assessment of the Influence of Immigration on Changes in Violent Crime Between 1990 and 2000," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(2), pages 531-553.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:91:y:2010:i:2:p:531-553
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John J. Donohue III & Steven D. Levitt, 2001. "The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Crime," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 379-420.
    2. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2004.037705_0 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Kristin F. Butcher & Anne Morrison Piehl, 1998. "Cross-city evidence on the relationship between immigration and crime," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 457-493.
    5. Kristin F. Butcher & Anne Morrison Piehl, 2005. "Why are immigrants' incarceration rates so low? evidence on selective immigration, deterrence, and deportation," Working Paper Series WP-05-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dai, Tiantian & Liu, Xiangbo & Xie, Biancen, 2013. "The impact of immigrants on host country crime," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 119(2), pages 157-161.
    2. Richard Wright & Erdal Tekin & Volkan Topalli & Chandler McClellan & Timothy Dickinson & Richard Rosenfeld, 2017. "Less Cash, Less Crime: Evidence from the Electronic Benefit Transfer Program," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(2), pages 361-383.
    3. Nicholas A. Emerick & Theodore R. Curry & Timothy W. Collins & S. Fernando Rodriguez, 2014. "Homicide and Social Disorganization on the Border: Implications for Latino and Immigrant Populations," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 95(2), pages 360-379, June.
    4. Matt Ruther, 2014. "The effect of growth in foreign born population share on county homicide rates: A spatial panel approach," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93, pages 1-23, November.
    5. Parker, Karen F. & Stansfield, Richard & McCall, Patricia L., 2016. "Temporal changes in racial violence, 1980 to 2006: A latent trajectory approach," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 1-11.
    6. Vaughn, Michael G. & Salas-Wright, Christopher P. & Maynard, Brandy R. & Qian, Zhengmin & Terzis, Lauren & Kusow, Abdi M. & DeLisi, Matt, 2014. "Criminal epidemiology and the immigrant paradox: Intergenerational discontinuity in violence and antisocial behavior among immigrants," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 483-490.
    7. repec:eee:touman:v:54:y:2016:i:c:p:383-392 is not listed on IDEAS

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