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International Cooperation, Coalitions Stability And Free Riding In A Game Of Pollution Control

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  • MICHÈLE BRETON
  • KARIMA FREDJ
  • GEORGES ZACCOUR

Abstract

We consider a set of countries that wish to sign an international agreement to control pollution. The problem is studied from the perspective of cooperative games and three possible definitions of the characteristic function of the game are analyzed. We further address the issue of free riding and the stability of coalitions. The challenge is to find a possible reconciliation of the two approaches. In other words, we are looking for a payment function which ensures the formation and stability of a large coalition, even if we consider that different countries are playing non‐cooperatively and are acting only in their own interest. Our results suggest that it is difficult to deter free riding and that no large coalition can emerge if countries decide to play non‐cooperatively.

Suggested Citation

  • Michèle Breton & Karima Fredj & Georges Zaccour, 2006. "International Cooperation, Coalitions Stability And Free Riding In A Game Of Pollution Control," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 74(1), pages 103-122, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:74:y:2006:i:1:p:103-122
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9957.2006.00485.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Effrosyni Diamantoudi & Eftichios S. Sartzetakis, 2006. "Stable International Environmental Agreements: An Analytical Approach," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 8(2), pages 247-263, May.
    2. Johan Eyckmans & Henry Tulkens, 2006. "Simulating Coalitionally Stable Burden Sharing Agreements for the Climate Change Problem," Springer Books, in: Parkash Chander & Jacques Drèze & C. Knox Lovell & Jack Mintz (ed.), Public goods, environmental externalities and fiscal competition, chapter 0, pages 218-249, Springer.
    3. Johan Eyckmans & Henry Tulkens, 1999. "Simulating with RICE Coalitionally Stable Burden Sharing Agreements for the Climate Change Problem," CESifo Working Paper Series 228, CESifo.
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    1. Juan‐Carlos Altamirano‐Cabrera & Michael Finus & Rob Dellink, 2008. "Do Abatement Quotas Lead To More Successful Climate Coalitions?," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 76(1), pages 104-129, January.
    2. Alejandro Caparrós & Jean-Christophe Péreau, 2017. "Multilateral versus sequential negotiations over climate change," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(2), pages 365-387.
    3. Alejandro Caparrós, 2016. "Bargaining and International Environmental Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 65(1), pages 5-31, September.
    4. Michael Finus & Matthew McGinty, 2015. "The Anti-Paradox of Cooperation: Diversity Pays!," Department of Economics Working Papers 40/15, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
    5. Ping Sun & Elena Parilina, 2022. "Impact of Utilities on the Structures of Stable Networks with Ordered Group Partitioning," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 1131-1162, December.
    6. Nadarajah, Saralees & Chan, Stephen & Afuecheta, Emmanuel, 2013. "On the characteristic function for asymmetric Student t distributions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 271-274.
    7. Michael Finus & Dirk Rübbelke, 2013. "Public Good Provision and Ancillary Benefits: The Case of Climate Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 56(2), pages 211-226, October.
    8. Alfred Endres & Bianca Rundshagen, 2013. "Incentives to Diffuse Advanced Abatement Technology Under the Formation of International Environmental Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 56(2), pages 177-210, October.

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