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Employment and Total Factor Productivity Convergence

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  • David Greasley
  • Jakob B. Madsen

Abstract

Using a new 16-country data set we demonstrate a robust negative employment-total factor productivity trade-off 1870-2004. Widely disparate cross country employment growth had a powerful long term influence on productivity dispersion. Unexceptional US productivity growth principally resulted from her exceptional employment growth rather than from her initially high productivity levels. The negative externalities associated with higher employment are shown to have dominated the diminishing of total factor productivity gaps among the 16 countries, and led to the erosion of US productivity leadership over the twentieth century. Copyright 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • David Greasley & Jakob B. Madsen, 2006. "Employment and Total Factor Productivity Convergence," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(4), pages 527-555, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:59:y:2006:i:4:p:527-555
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/j.1467-6435.2006.00348.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brander, James A & Dowrick, Steve, 1994. "The Role of Fertility and Population in Economic Growth: Empirical Results from Aggregate Cross-National Data," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 7(1), pages 1-25.
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    Cited by:

    1. Greasley, David & Hanley, Nicholas & McLaughlin, Eoin & Oxley, Les, 2014. "The Emperor Has New Clothes: Empirical Tests of Mainstream Theories of Economic Growth," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2014-08, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    2. Blum, Matthias & Hanley, Nicholas & McLaughlin, Eoin, 2013. "Genuine savings and future well-being in Germany, 1850-2000," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2013-13, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    3. Greasley, David & Hanley, Nick & McLaughlin, Eoin & Oxley, Les, 2014. "The Emperor Has New Clothes: Empirical Tests of Mainstream Theories of Economic Growth," 2007 Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland, Oregon TN 2015-01, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. repec:sss:wpaper:201401 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Albert van der Horst & Hugo Rojas-Romagosa & Leon Bettendorf, 2009. "Does employment affect productivity?," CPB Discussion Paper 119, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

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