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Success and Failure of Economic Sanctions

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  • van Bergeijk, Peter A G

Abstract

The author's experience with economic sanctions as a tool of international politics is ambivalent. Since opinions pro and contra the effectiveness of sanctions are based on biased selections of case studies, the debate lacks both clarity about how sanctions work and a solid empirical foundation. To alleviate these deficiencies, this paper presents a review of literature and some empirical findings. A reduced-form equation fitted to the data of a recent study by G. C. Hufbauer and J. J. Schott (1985) correctly predicts failure and success in 83 percent out of eighty sanctions in the years 1946-83. Copyright 1989 by WWZ and Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag AG

Suggested Citation

  • van Bergeijk, Peter A G, 1989. "Success and Failure of Economic Sanctions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(3), pages 385-404.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:42:y:1989:i:3:p:385-404
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    Cited by:

    1. Caruso Raul, 2003. "The Impact of International Economic Sanctions on Trade: An Empirical Analysis," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(2), pages 1-36, April.
    2. Garoupa, Nuno R & Gata, Joao E, 2002. "A Theory of International Conflict Management and Sanctioning," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 110(1-2), pages 41-65, January.
    3. Dizaji, Sajjad Faraji, 2014. "The effects of oil shocks on government expenditures and government revenues nexus (with an application to Iran's sanctions)," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 299-313.
    4. Afesorgbor, Sylvanus Kwaku & Mahadevan, Renuka, 2016. "The Impact of Economic Sanctions on Income Inequality of Target States," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 1-11.
    5. Dizaji, S.F., 2012. "The effects of oil shocks on government expenditures and government revenues nexus in Iran (as a developing oil-export based economy)," ISS Working Papers - General Series 540, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    6. Jordán, Gyula, 2005. "Egyoldalú vagy kölcsönös függés?. Tajvan és a Kínai Népköztársaság gazdasági kapcsolatai
      [Unilateral or mutual dependence?. The economic relations of Taiwan and the Peoples Republic of China]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 163-183.
    7. van Bergeijk, Peter A. G. & van Marrewijk, Charles, 1995. "Why do sanctions need time to work? Adjustment, learning and anticipation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 75-86, April.

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