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Space And The Measurement Of Income Segregation


  • Casey J. Dawkins


This paper proposes a new "spatial ordering index" that that can be used to quantify the dependence of a given pattern of income segregation on the spatial arrangement of neighborhoods. Unlike other spatial measures of income segregation proposed in the literature, the spatial ordering index is less sensitive to the presence of outliers, satisfies the "principle of transfers," and is flexible enough to quantify a variety of spatial patterns of segregation. The index can be interpreted in terms of the ratio of two covariances. Properties of the proposed measure are demonstrated using an example from the city of Baltimore, Maryland. Copyright Blackwell Publishing, Inc. 2007

Suggested Citation

  • Casey J. Dawkins, 2007. "Space And The Measurement Of Income Segregation," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 255-272.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:47:y:2007:i:2:p:255-272

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Yitzhaki, Shlomo & Lerman, Robert I, 1991. "Income Stratification and Income Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 37(3), pages 313-329, September.
    2. Shlomo Yitzhaki, 2003. "Gini’s Mean difference: a superior measure of variability for non-normal distributions," Metron - International Journal of Statistics, Dipartimento di Statistica, Probabilità e Statistiche Applicate - University of Rome, vol. 0(2), pages 285-316.
    3. Kelejian, Harry H. & Robinson, Dennis P., 1992. "Spatial autocorrelation : A new computationally simple test with an application to per capita county police expenditures," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 317-331, September.
    4. Casey J. Dawkins, 2004. "Measuring the Spatial Pattern of Residential Segregation," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 41(4), pages 833-851, April.
    5. Lerman, Robert I. & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 1984. "A note on the calculation and interpretation of the Gini index," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 15(3-4), pages 363-368.
    6. Shalit, Haim, 1985. "Calculating the Gini Index of Inequality for Individual Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 47(2), pages 185-189, May.
    7. Sanjoy Chakravorty, 1996. "A Measurement of Spatial Disparity: The Case of Income Inequality," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 33(9), pages 1671-1686, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Olga Alonso-Villar, 2008. "What are we assuming when using inequality measures to quantify geographic concentration? An axiomatic approach," Working Papers 0801, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
    2. Sergio Rey & Richard Smith, 2013. "A spatial decomposition of the Gini coefficient," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 55-70, July.

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