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Tax Overpayments, Tax Evasion, and Book-Tax Differences

  • LASZLO GOERKE

A strictly risk-averse manager makes joint decisions on a firm's tax payments and book profit declarations according to accounting standards. It is analyzed how the incentives to overpay or evade taxes and to inflate book profits are influenced by (1) the composition of the manager's remuneration, (2) the ability to control the manager's actions, (3) the costs of making untruthful profit declarations, and (4) the tax rate. If the firm's owner or the government take into account these effects when pursuing their own objectives, the changes in tax payments and book profit declarations become theoretically more ambiguous. Copyright � 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..

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Article provided by Association for Public Economic Theory in its journal Journal of Public Economic Theory.

Volume (Year): 10 (2008)
Issue (Month): 4 (08)
Pages: 643-671

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jpbect:v:10:y:2008:i:4:p:643-671
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  1. Shackelford, Douglas A. & Shevlin, Terry, 2001. "Empirical tax research in accounting," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1-3), pages 321-387, September.
  2. Robin Boadway & Motohiro Sato, 2000. "The Optimality of Punishing Only the Innocent: The Case of Tax Evasion," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 7(6), pages 641-664, December.
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  4. Mihir Desai & Dhammika Dharmapala, . "Corporate Tax Avoidance and High Powered Incentives," American Law & Economics Association Annual Meetings 1006, American Law & Economics Association.
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  7. Michelle Hanlon & Terry Shevlin, 2005. "Book-Tax Conformity for Corporate Income: An Introduction to the Issues," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 19, pages 101-134 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. Murphy, Kevin J., 1999. "Executive compensation," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 38, pages 2485-2563 Elsevier.
  10. Allingham, Michael G. & Sandmo, Agnar, 1972. "Income tax evasion: a theoretical analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3-4), pages 323-338, November.
  11. Mihir A. Desai, 2003. "The Divergence between Book Income and Tax Income," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 17, pages 169-208 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Hanlon, Michelle & Laplante, Stacie Kelley & Shevlin, Terry, 2005. "Evidence for the Possible Information Loss of Conforming Book Income and Taxable Income," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(2), pages 407-42, October.
  13. Mihir A. Desai, 2005. "The Degradation of Reported Corporate Profits," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(4), pages 171-192, Fall.
  14. Douglas A. Shackelford & Joel Slemrod & James M. Sallee, 2007. "A Unifying Model of How the Tax System and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles Affect Corporate Behavior," NBER Working Papers 12873, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Plesko, George A., 2004. "Corporate Tax Avoidance and the Properties of Corporate Earnings," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 57(3), pages 729-37, September.
  16. Goerke, Laszlo & Runkel, Marco, 2006. "Profit Tax Evasion under Oligopoly with Endogenous Market Structure," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 59(4), pages 851-57, December.
  17. Goldman, Eitan & Slezak, Steve L., 2006. "An equilibrium model of incentive contracts in the presence of information manipulation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 603-626, June.
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